An addendum to "Effects of Noise on Speech Production

Acoustic and Perceptual Analyses" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 917-928 (1988)]

W. V. Summers, K. Johnson, David Pisoni, R. H. Bernacki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors respond to Fitch's comments [H. Fitch, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 2017-2019 (1989)] on an earlier paper. New analyses are presented to address the question of whether F1 differences observed in the original report are an artifact of linear predictive coding (LPC) analysis techniques. Contrary to Fitch's claims, the results suggest that the F1 differences originally reported are, in fact, due to changes in vocal tract resonance characteristics. It is concluded that there are important acoustic-phonetic differences in speech when talkers speak in noise. These differences reflect changes in both glottal and supraglottal events that are designed to maintain speech intelligibility under adverse conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1717-1721
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume86
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1989

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phonetics
intelligibility
acoustics
artifacts
coding
Acoustics
Speech Production
Acoustic Phonetics
Speech Intelligibility
Talkers
Artifact
Vocal Tract

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

An addendum to "Effects of Noise on Speech Production : Acoustic and Perceptual Analyses" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 917-928 (1988)]. / Summers, W. V.; Johnson, K.; Pisoni, David; Bernacki, R. H.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 86, No. 5, 11.1989, p. 1717-1721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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