An Electronic Daily Diary Study of Anal Intercourse in Drug-Using Women

Grace L. Reynolds, Dennis G. Fisher, Jean Philippe Laurenceau, J. Fortenberry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Women (N = 138) with histories of illicit drug use were recruited into an electronic diary study that used Android smartphones for data collection. The diary was to be completed each day for 12 weeks using an “app” created in HTML5 and accessed over the Internet via smartphone. Data collection included information on sexual behaviors with up to 10 partners per day and contextual factors surrounding sexual behavior such as drug use before/after, type of sexual behavior (oral, vaginal, anal), and other activities such as using condoms for vaginal and anal intercourse and use of sexual lubricants. The sample was predominantly African American (58 %); 20 % Latina, 20 % White and 2 % reported as Other. Most women reported either less than a high school education (33 %) or having a high school diploma (33 %). The mean age was 39 years (SD = 11.78). Anal intercourse occurred on days when women also reported using illicit drugs, specifically methamphetamine and cocaine. Anal intercourse was not an isolated sexual activity, but took place on days when vaginal intercourse and giving and receiving oral sex also occurred along with illicit drug use. Anal intercourse also occurred on days when women reported they wanted sex. HIV prevention interventions must address the risks of anal intercourse for women, taking into account concurrent drug use and sexual pleasure that may reduce individual harm-reduction behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2325-2332
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2015

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Keywords

  • Daily diary study
  • Electronic smartphone data collection
  • Heterosexual anal intercourse
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

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