An induced blood pressure rise does not alter upper airway resistance in sleeping humans

Christine R. Wilson, Shalini Manchanda, David Crabtree, James B. Skatrud, Jerome A. Dempsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sleep apnea is associated with episodic increases in systemic blood pressure. We investigated whether transient increases in arterial pressure altered upper airway resistance and/or breathing pattern in nine sleeping humans (snorers and nonsnorers). A pressure-tipped catheter was placed below the base of the tongue, and flow was measured from a nose or face mask. During non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, we injected 40- to 200-μg iv boluses of phenylephrine. Parasympathetic blockade was used if bradycardia was excessive. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) rose by 20 ± 5 (mean ± SD) mmHg (range 12-37 mmHg) within 12 s and remained elevated for 105 s. There were no significant changes in inspiratory or expiratory pharyngeal resistance (measured at peak flow, peak pressure, 0.2 1/s or by evaluating the dynamic pressure-flow relationship). At peak MAP, end-tidal CO2 pressure fell by 1.5 Torr and remained low for 20-25 s. At 26 s after peak MAP, tidal volume fell by 19%, consistent with hypocapnic ventilatory inhibition. We conclude that transient increases in MAP of a magnitude commonly observed during non- rapid-eye-movement sleep-disordered breathing do not increase upper airway resistance and, therefore, will not perpetuate subsequent obstructive events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-276
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume84
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

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Keywords

  • Barorecepter
  • Phenylephrine
  • Respiration
  • Sleep apnea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Wilson, C. R., Manchanda, S., Crabtree, D., Skatrud, J. B., & Dempsey, J. A. (1998). An induced blood pressure rise does not alter upper airway resistance in sleeping humans. Journal of Applied Physiology, 84(1), 269-276.