An intervention to improve communication between breast cancer survivors and their physicians

Cleveland G. Shields, Kim Wagler Ziner, Sara A. Bourff, Katherine Schilling, Qianqian Zhao, Patrick Monahan, George Sledge, Victoria Champion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast cancer survivors often use clues to convey their concerns to their oncologists. The authors conducted a randomized trial of a communication coaching intervention in which 22 female breast cancer survivors were randomized to the coaching and 22 to treatment as usual. They hypothesized that the intervention would increase breast cancer self-efficacy, improve mood, and reduce fears of recurrence. Through a series of ANCOVAs they found that the intervention led to increases in self-efficacy. Changes in self-efficacy predicted changes in anxiety, depression, and womanhood fears. This coaching intervention shows promise but requires additional studies to establish is efficacy and effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)610-629
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Survivors
Communication
Breast Neoplasms
Physicians
Fear
Anxiety
Depression
Recurrence
Mentoring
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • coaching intervention
  • nursing
  • physician-patient communication
  • randomized trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

An intervention to improve communication between breast cancer survivors and their physicians. / Shields, Cleveland G.; Ziner, Kim Wagler; Bourff, Sara A.; Schilling, Katherine; Zhao, Qianqian; Monahan, Patrick; Sledge, George; Champion, Victoria.

In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Vol. 28, No. 6, 11.2010, p. 610-629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shields, Cleveland G. ; Ziner, Kim Wagler ; Bourff, Sara A. ; Schilling, Katherine ; Zhao, Qianqian ; Monahan, Patrick ; Sledge, George ; Champion, Victoria. / An intervention to improve communication between breast cancer survivors and their physicians. In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 610-629.
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