An offline mobile nutrition monitoring intervention for varying-literacy patients receiving hemodialysis

A pilot study examining usage and usability

Kay Connelly, Katie A. Siek, Beenish Chaudry, Josette Jones, Kim Astroth, Janet Welch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Design and evaluation of the dietary intake monitoring application (DIMA) to assist varying-literacy patients receiving hemodialysis to adhere to their prescribed dietary regimen. Methods An iterative, user-centered design process informed by Bandura's social cognitive theory was employed to design DIMAda mobile application that utilizes touch-screen, visual interfaces; barcode scanning; and voice recording to assist varying-literacy patients receiving hemodialysis to self-monitor their diet. A pilot field study was conducted where 18 patients receiving hemodialysis were recruited face-to-face from two dialysis facilities to use DIMA for 6 weeks. Subjects recorded their dietary intake using DIMA and met with research assistants three times each week. All interactions with DIMA were logged. Subjects' interdialytic weight gain was recorded throughout the study. At the end of the study, two face-to-face questionnaires were administered to assess usability and context of use. Results Subjects were able to use DIMA successfullyd12 subjects used DIMA as much or more at the end of the study as they did at the beginning and reported that DIMA helped them change their diet. Subjects had difficulty using the barcode scanner. Viewing past meals was the most used of the reflection mechanisms in DIMA. Conclusion Results suggest that while many design features were useful, some could be improved. In particular, future versions of DIMA will be on a smartphone using a camera for barcode scanning, integrate feedback and past meal reflection into the normal flow of the application, and support visual cues when selecting food items.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-712
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Renal Dialysis
Meals
Mobile Applications
Diet
Weight Gain
Cues
Dialysis
Food
Research
Literacy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Smartphone
Social Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

An offline mobile nutrition monitoring intervention for varying-literacy patients receiving hemodialysis : A pilot study examining usage and usability. / Connelly, Kay; Siek, Katie A.; Chaudry, Beenish; Jones, Josette; Astroth, Kim; Welch, Janet.

In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Vol. 19, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 705-712.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Connelly, Kay ; Siek, Katie A. ; Chaudry, Beenish ; Jones, Josette ; Astroth, Kim ; Welch, Janet. / An offline mobile nutrition monitoring intervention for varying-literacy patients receiving hemodialysis : A pilot study examining usage and usability. In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. 2012 ; Vol. 19, No. 5. pp. 705-712.
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