An open-label naturalistic pilot study of acamprosate in youth with autistic disorder

Craig A. Erickson, Maureen Early, Kimberly A. Stigler, Logan K. Wink, Jennifer E. Mullett, Christopher J. McDougle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To date, placebo-controlled drug trials targeting the core social impairment of autistic disorder (autism) have had uniformly negative results. Given this, the search for new potentially novel agents targeting the core social impairment of autism continues. Acamprosate is U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to treat alcohol dependence. The drug likely impacts both gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate neurotransmission. This study describes our initial open-label experience with acamprosate targeting social impairment in youth with autism. In this naturalistic report, five of six youth (mean age, 9.5 years) were judged treatment responders to acamprosate (mean dose 1,110 mg/day) over 10 to 30 weeks (mean duration, 20 weeks) of treatment. Acamprosate was well tolerated with only mild gastrointestinal adverse effects noted in three (50%) subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)565-569
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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Autistic Disorder
United States Food and Drug Administration
Drug Delivery Systems
Synaptic Transmission
Pharmaceutical Preparations
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Alcoholism
Glutamic Acid
Placebos
acamprosate
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Erickson, C. A., Early, M., Stigler, K. A., Wink, L. K., Mullett, J. E., & McDougle, C. J. (2011). An open-label naturalistic pilot study of acamprosate in youth with autistic disorder. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 21(6), 565-569. https://doi.org/10.1089/cap.2011.0034

An open-label naturalistic pilot study of acamprosate in youth with autistic disorder. / Erickson, Craig A.; Early, Maureen; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Wink, Logan K.; Mullett, Jennifer E.; McDougle, Christopher J.

In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, Vol. 21, No. 6, 01.12.2011, p. 565-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erickson, CA, Early, M, Stigler, KA, Wink, LK, Mullett, JE & McDougle, CJ 2011, 'An open-label naturalistic pilot study of acamprosate in youth with autistic disorder', Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 565-569. https://doi.org/10.1089/cap.2011.0034
Erickson, Craig A. ; Early, Maureen ; Stigler, Kimberly A. ; Wink, Logan K. ; Mullett, Jennifer E. ; McDougle, Christopher J. / An open-label naturalistic pilot study of acamprosate in youth with autistic disorder. In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 565-569.
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