An oxidation-sensing mechanism is used by the global regulator MgrA in Staphylococcus aureus

Peng R. Chen, Taeok Bae, Wade A. Williams, Erica M. Duguid, Phoebe A. Rice, Olaf Schneewind, Chuan He

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a human pathogen responsible for most wound and hospital-acquired infections. The protein MgrA is both an important virulence determinant during infection and a regulator of antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. The crystal structure of the MgrA homodimer, solved at 2.86 Å, indicates the presence of a unique cysteine residue located at the interface of the protein dimer. We discovered that this cysteine residue can be oxidized by various reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxide. Cysteine oxidation leads to dissociation of MgrA from DNA and initiation of signaling pathways that turn on antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. The oxidation-sensing mechanism is typically used by bacteria to counter challenges of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Our study reveals that in S. aureus, MgrA adopts a similar mechanism but uses it to globally regulate different defensive pathways.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)591-595
Number of pages5
JournalNature Chemical Biology
Volume2
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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Staphylococcus aureus
Cysteine
Microbial Drug Resistance
Hydrogen Peroxide
Reactive Oxygen Species
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Cross Infection
Virulence
Proteins
Bacteria
DNA
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Chen, P. R., Bae, T., Williams, W. A., Duguid, E. M., Rice, P. A., Schneewind, O., & He, C. (2006). An oxidation-sensing mechanism is used by the global regulator MgrA in Staphylococcus aureus. Nature Chemical Biology, 2(11), 591-595. https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio820

An oxidation-sensing mechanism is used by the global regulator MgrA in Staphylococcus aureus. / Chen, Peng R.; Bae, Taeok; Williams, Wade A.; Duguid, Erica M.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Schneewind, Olaf; He, Chuan.

In: Nature Chemical Biology, Vol. 2, No. 11, 11.2006, p. 591-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, PR, Bae, T, Williams, WA, Duguid, EM, Rice, PA, Schneewind, O & He, C 2006, 'An oxidation-sensing mechanism is used by the global regulator MgrA in Staphylococcus aureus', Nature Chemical Biology, vol. 2, no. 11, pp. 591-595. https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio820
Chen, Peng R. ; Bae, Taeok ; Williams, Wade A. ; Duguid, Erica M. ; Rice, Phoebe A. ; Schneewind, Olaf ; He, Chuan. / An oxidation-sensing mechanism is used by the global regulator MgrA in Staphylococcus aureus. In: Nature Chemical Biology. 2006 ; Vol. 2, No. 11. pp. 591-595.
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