Analysis of nonfatal dog bites in children

Dawn Marie Daniels, Rovane B S Ritzi, Joseph O'Neil, L. R. Scherer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Dog bites are a significant public health problem among children. The purpose of this study was to examine the hospital incidence, hospital charges, and characteristics of dog bite injuries among children by age group and hospitalization status who were treated at our health care system to guide prevention programs and policies. METHODS: An electronic hospital database identified all patients younger than 18 years who were treated for dog bites from 1999 to 2006. Demographics, injury information, hospital admission status, length of stay, hospital charges, and payer source were collected. A further review of the narrative part of the inpatient electronic database was examined to identify owner of the dog, type of dog, and circumstances surrounding the incident. RESULTS: During 8 years, 1,347 children younger than 18 years were treated for dog bites. The majority were treated and released from the emergency department (91%). Of the 66 children (4.9%) requiring inpatient admission, the median length of stay was 2 days. Victims were frequently male (56.9%) and <8 years (55.2%). Children younger than 5 years represented 34% of all dog bite victims, but 50% of all children requiring hospitalization. Thirty-seven percent of all children admitted to the hospital were bitten by a family dog. The cost of direct medical care during the study was $2.15 million. CONCLUSION: Dog bite visits comprised 1.5% of all pediatric injuries treated in our hospital system during the study period. The majority (91%) of all dog bite visits were treated and released from the emergency department. Injuries to the head/neck region increased the odds of requiring 23 hour observation (OR, 1.95) and age less than 5 years increased the odds of being admitted as an inpatient (OR, 3.3).

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume66
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

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Bites and Stings
Dogs
Hospital Charges
Inpatients
Hospital Emergency Service
Length of Stay
Wounds and Injuries
Hospitalization Insurance
Databases
Craniocerebral Trauma
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization
Neck
Public Health
Age Groups
Observation
Demography
Pediatrics
Delivery of Health Care
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Analysis of nonfatal dog bites in children. / Daniels, Dawn Marie; Ritzi, Rovane B S; O'Neil, Joseph; Scherer, L. R.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 66, No. SUPPL. 3, 03.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Daniels, Dawn Marie ; Ritzi, Rovane B S ; O'Neil, Joseph ; Scherer, L. R. / Analysis of nonfatal dog bites in children. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2009 ; Vol. 66, No. SUPPL. 3.
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