Antisense inhibition of macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α blocks bone destruction in a model of myeloma bone disease

Sun Jin Choi, Yasuo Oba, Yair Gazitt, Melissa Alsina, Jose Cruz, Judith Anderson, G. David Roodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We recently identified macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α (MIP-1α) as a factor produced by multiple myeloma (MM) cells that maybe responsible for the bone destruction in MM (1). To investigate the role of MIP-1α in MM bone disease in vivo, the human MM-derived cell line ARH was stably transfected with an antisense construct to MIP-1α (AS-ARH) and tested for its capacity to induce MM bone disease in SCID mice. Human MIP-1α levels in marrow plasma from AS-ARH mice were markedly decreased compared with controls treated with ARH cells transfected with empty vector (EV-ARH). Mice treated with AS-ARH cells lived longer than controls and, unlike the controls, they showed no radiologically identifiable lytic lesions. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that osteoclasts (OCLs) per square millimeter of bone and OCLs per millimeter of bone surface of AS-ARH mice were significantly less than in EV-ARH mice, and the percentage of tumors per total bone area was also significantly decreased. AS-ARH cells demonstrated decreased adherence to marrow stromal cells, due to reduced expression of the α5β1 integrin and diminished homing capacity and survival. These data support an important role for MIP-1α in cell homing, survival, and bone destruction in MM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1833-1841
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume108
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins
Bone Diseases
Multiple Myeloma
Bone and Bones
Osteoclasts
Bone Marrow
SCID Mice
Stromal Cells
Integrins
Cell Survival
Cell Line
Survival
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Antisense inhibition of macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α blocks bone destruction in a model of myeloma bone disease. / Choi, Sun Jin; Oba, Yasuo; Gazitt, Yair; Alsina, Melissa; Cruz, Jose; Anderson, Judith; Roodman, G. David.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 108, No. 12, 2001, p. 1833-1841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choi, Sun Jin ; Oba, Yasuo ; Gazitt, Yair ; Alsina, Melissa ; Cruz, Jose ; Anderson, Judith ; Roodman, G. David. / Antisense inhibition of macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α blocks bone destruction in a model of myeloma bone disease. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2001 ; Vol. 108, No. 12. pp. 1833-1841.
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