Approach to functional magnetic resonance imaging of language based on models of language organization

P. McGraw, V. P. Mathews, Y. Wang, M. D. Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging has been a useful tool in the evaluation of language both in normal individuals and in patient populations. It has improved the understanding of language in terms of both anatomic and cognitive models. Although it has confirmed many earlier theories concerning cerebral processing, it has raised unexpected questions, such as how information is encoded into the brain during learning and how it is affected by age and gender. These and other questions remain unanswered, but fMRI holds promise as a useful clinical tool in terms of language localization, cerebral dominance, sensory reception, and motor expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-353
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroimaging Clinics of North America
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Oct 11 2001

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Language
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Cerebral Dominance
Anatomic Models
Learning
Brain
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Approach to functional magnetic resonance imaging of language based on models of language organization. / McGraw, P.; Mathews, V. P.; Wang, Y.; Phillips, M. D.

In: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, Vol. 11, No. 2, 11.10.2001, p. 343-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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