Are community health centers prepared for bioterrorism?

Art Clawson, Nir Menachemi, Leslie Beitsch, Robert G. Brooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community health centers (CHCs) are essential in the delivery of primary care services to underserved populations. Given the critical function of CHCs, surprisingly little is known about their role in preparing for or responding to acts of terrorism. This survey-based study examines the state of CHCs in terrorism preparedness and assesses their training needs. Of the administrators who responded to the survey, 87% indicated that their centers had an emergency response or disaster plan. Of those, 78% indicated they had updated their plans within the past year. Among those who had a written plan, 41% addressed bioterrorism preparedness, 38% had contingencies for a mass influx of patients, and 3% indicated that their plans addressed increasing operational capacity. Additionally, while 48% reported having assessed the education and training needs of their professional staff in the area of disease surveillance and reporting, only 24% had assessed these needs in relation to bioterrorism. Our findings suggest that CHCs have made great strides in preparing for some emergencies but that preparedness does not yet extend to specifically include terrorism events. Policy and practice recommendations are included to more fully develop CHCs as a resource.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-63
Number of pages9
JournalBiosecurity and Bioterrorism
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 11 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bioterrorism
bioterrorism
Community Health Centers
Terrorism
Health
terrorism
health
community
Civil Defense
education and training
Disasters
Vulnerable Populations
Administrative Personnel
contingency
surveillance
disaster
Primary Health Care
Emergencies
Education
staff

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Are community health centers prepared for bioterrorism? / Clawson, Art; Menachemi, Nir; Beitsch, Leslie; Brooks, Robert G.

In: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism, Vol. 4, No. 1, 11.08.2006, p. 55-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clawson, Art ; Menachemi, Nir ; Beitsch, Leslie ; Brooks, Robert G. / Are community health centers prepared for bioterrorism?. In: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism. 2006 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 55-63.
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