Are Physician Productivity and Quality of Care Related?

Nir Menachemi, Valerie Yeager, Elisabeth Welty, Bryn Manzella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between clinical quality of care and physician productivity in the public sector clinical setting. This longitudinal study takes place in Jefferson County, Alabama using data from six public sector clinics. Data representing 21 physicians across 13 consecutive quarters representing 44,765 person observations were analyzed. Four variables were selected to represent quality of care for this pediatric patient population; two of which pertained to antibiotic use and two pertained to asthma care. Findings from multivariate analyses examining each quality of care measure and controlling for other visit and practice characteristics indicate that three of the four quality measures were significantly related to productivity. Specifically, the percent of asthma patients with documented asthma severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.24, p =.04), although the magnitude of this relationship was small. The percent of asthma patients prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid who also had a severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.23, p =.03) and the percent of patients prescribed oral antibiotics was marginally negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.09, p =.09). In general, findings suggest that a relationship exists between quality of healthcare and physician productivity. Future research should continue to examine this relationship across other disciplines and healthcare settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-101
Number of pages9
JournalJournal for Healthcare Quality
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Quality of Health Care
Physicians
Asthma
Public Sector
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Longitudinal Studies
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Multivariate Analysis
Pediatrics
Delivery of Health Care
Population

Keywords

  • Antibiotic use
  • Asthma
  • Physician productivity
  • Public health
  • Quality of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Are Physician Productivity and Quality of Care Related? / Menachemi, Nir; Yeager, Valerie; Welty, Elisabeth; Manzella, Bryn.

In: Journal for Healthcare Quality, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 93-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Menachemi, Nir ; Yeager, Valerie ; Welty, Elisabeth ; Manzella, Bryn. / Are Physician Productivity and Quality of Care Related?. In: Journal for Healthcare Quality. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 93-101.
@article{77d749d083674c758376c65077d04df9,
title = "Are Physician Productivity and Quality of Care Related?",
abstract = "This study examines the relationship between clinical quality of care and physician productivity in the public sector clinical setting. This longitudinal study takes place in Jefferson County, Alabama using data from six public sector clinics. Data representing 21 physicians across 13 consecutive quarters representing 44,765 person observations were analyzed. Four variables were selected to represent quality of care for this pediatric patient population; two of which pertained to antibiotic use and two pertained to asthma care. Findings from multivariate analyses examining each quality of care measure and controlling for other visit and practice characteristics indicate that three of the four quality measures were significantly related to productivity. Specifically, the percent of asthma patients with documented asthma severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity ({\ss} = 2.24, p =.04), although the magnitude of this relationship was small. The percent of asthma patients prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid who also had a severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity ({\ss} = 2.23, p =.03) and the percent of patients prescribed oral antibiotics was marginally negatively related to physician productivity ({\ss} = 2.09, p =.09). In general, findings suggest that a relationship exists between quality of healthcare and physician productivity. Future research should continue to examine this relationship across other disciplines and healthcare settings.",
keywords = "Antibiotic use, Asthma, Physician productivity, Public health, Quality of care",
author = "Nir Menachemi and Valerie Yeager and Elisabeth Welty and Bryn Manzella",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jhq.12038",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "93--101",
journal = "Journal for healthcare quality : official publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality",
issn = "1062-2551",
publisher = "National Association for Healthcare Quality",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are Physician Productivity and Quality of Care Related?

AU - Menachemi, Nir

AU - Yeager, Valerie

AU - Welty, Elisabeth

AU - Manzella, Bryn

PY - 2015/3/1

Y1 - 2015/3/1

N2 - This study examines the relationship between clinical quality of care and physician productivity in the public sector clinical setting. This longitudinal study takes place in Jefferson County, Alabama using data from six public sector clinics. Data representing 21 physicians across 13 consecutive quarters representing 44,765 person observations were analyzed. Four variables were selected to represent quality of care for this pediatric patient population; two of which pertained to antibiotic use and two pertained to asthma care. Findings from multivariate analyses examining each quality of care measure and controlling for other visit and practice characteristics indicate that three of the four quality measures were significantly related to productivity. Specifically, the percent of asthma patients with documented asthma severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.24, p =.04), although the magnitude of this relationship was small. The percent of asthma patients prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid who also had a severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.23, p =.03) and the percent of patients prescribed oral antibiotics was marginally negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.09, p =.09). In general, findings suggest that a relationship exists between quality of healthcare and physician productivity. Future research should continue to examine this relationship across other disciplines and healthcare settings.

AB - This study examines the relationship between clinical quality of care and physician productivity in the public sector clinical setting. This longitudinal study takes place in Jefferson County, Alabama using data from six public sector clinics. Data representing 21 physicians across 13 consecutive quarters representing 44,765 person observations were analyzed. Four variables were selected to represent quality of care for this pediatric patient population; two of which pertained to antibiotic use and two pertained to asthma care. Findings from multivariate analyses examining each quality of care measure and controlling for other visit and practice characteristics indicate that three of the four quality measures were significantly related to productivity. Specifically, the percent of asthma patients with documented asthma severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.24, p =.04), although the magnitude of this relationship was small. The percent of asthma patients prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid who also had a severity classification was negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.23, p =.03) and the percent of patients prescribed oral antibiotics was marginally negatively related to physician productivity (ß = 2.09, p =.09). In general, findings suggest that a relationship exists between quality of healthcare and physician productivity. Future research should continue to examine this relationship across other disciplines and healthcare settings.

KW - Antibiotic use

KW - Asthma

KW - Physician productivity

KW - Public health

KW - Quality of care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942772208&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942772208&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jhq.12038

DO - 10.1111/jhq.12038

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 93

EP - 101

JO - Journal for healthcare quality : official publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality

JF - Journal for healthcare quality : official publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality

SN - 1062-2551

IS - 2

ER -