Are there differences in treatment and survival between poor, older black and white women with breast cancer?

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Abstract

Objectives To explore differences in treatment and survival outcome between poor, older black and white women with breast cancer. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Public safety net hospital. Participants Women aged 65 and older diagnosed with breast cancer from 1999 to 2008 (n = 1,000). Measurements Breast cancer treatments that black and white women sought were compared using the Pearson chi-square test. All-cause mortality of black and white women was compared using hazard ratios derived from a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Results There was no significant difference between older black and white women in surgical treatment, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy over the study period. Race was not a significant predictor of survival in the Cox proportional hazards model that controlled for stage of cancer, age at diagnosis, dual-eligibility status, comorbid conditions, body mass index, smoking history, mammogram screening, and treatment for breast cancer. Conclusion Race did not appear to affect treatment or mortality in a cohort of older women with low socioeconomic status. This may be associated with similar healthcare delivery and equivalent access to health care for the older black and white women in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2008-2013
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume63
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Breast Neoplasms
Survival
Proportional Hazards Models
Therapeutics
Safety-net Providers
Dual (Psychiatry) Diagnosis
Health Services Accessibility
Mortality
Chi-Square Distribution
hydroquinone
Social Class
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Radiotherapy
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
History
Hormones
Delivery of Health Care
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • black
  • breast cancer
  • elderly
  • survival
  • white

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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title = "Are there differences in treatment and survival between poor, older black and white women with breast cancer?",
abstract = "Objectives To explore differences in treatment and survival outcome between poor, older black and white women with breast cancer. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Public safety net hospital. Participants Women aged 65 and older diagnosed with breast cancer from 1999 to 2008 (n = 1,000). Measurements Breast cancer treatments that black and white women sought were compared using the Pearson chi-square test. All-cause mortality of black and white women was compared using hazard ratios derived from a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Results There was no significant difference between older black and white women in surgical treatment, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy over the study period. Race was not a significant predictor of survival in the Cox proportional hazards model that controlled for stage of cancer, age at diagnosis, dual-eligibility status, comorbid conditions, body mass index, smoking history, mammogram screening, and treatment for breast cancer. Conclusion Race did not appear to affect treatment or mortality in a cohort of older women with low socioeconomic status. This may be associated with similar healthcare delivery and equivalent access to health care for the older black and white women in this study.",
keywords = "black, breast cancer, elderly, survival, white",
author = "Himani Aggarwal and Christopher Callahan and Kathy Miller and Wanzhu Tu and Patrick Loehrer",
year = "2015",
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doi = "10.1111/jgs.13669",
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pages = "2008--2013",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Are there differences in treatment and survival between poor, older black and white women with breast cancer?

AU - Aggarwal, Himani

AU - Callahan, Christopher

AU - Miller, Kathy

AU - Tu, Wanzhu

AU - Loehrer, Patrick

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - Objectives To explore differences in treatment and survival outcome between poor, older black and white women with breast cancer. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Public safety net hospital. Participants Women aged 65 and older diagnosed with breast cancer from 1999 to 2008 (n = 1,000). Measurements Breast cancer treatments that black and white women sought were compared using the Pearson chi-square test. All-cause mortality of black and white women was compared using hazard ratios derived from a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Results There was no significant difference between older black and white women in surgical treatment, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy over the study period. Race was not a significant predictor of survival in the Cox proportional hazards model that controlled for stage of cancer, age at diagnosis, dual-eligibility status, comorbid conditions, body mass index, smoking history, mammogram screening, and treatment for breast cancer. Conclusion Race did not appear to affect treatment or mortality in a cohort of older women with low socioeconomic status. This may be associated with similar healthcare delivery and equivalent access to health care for the older black and white women in this study.

AB - Objectives To explore differences in treatment and survival outcome between poor, older black and white women with breast cancer. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Public safety net hospital. Participants Women aged 65 and older diagnosed with breast cancer from 1999 to 2008 (n = 1,000). Measurements Breast cancer treatments that black and white women sought were compared using the Pearson chi-square test. All-cause mortality of black and white women was compared using hazard ratios derived from a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Results There was no significant difference between older black and white women in surgical treatment, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy over the study period. Race was not a significant predictor of survival in the Cox proportional hazards model that controlled for stage of cancer, age at diagnosis, dual-eligibility status, comorbid conditions, body mass index, smoking history, mammogram screening, and treatment for breast cancer. Conclusion Race did not appear to affect treatment or mortality in a cohort of older women with low socioeconomic status. This may be associated with similar healthcare delivery and equivalent access to health care for the older black and white women in this study.

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KW - breast cancer

KW - elderly

KW - survival

KW - white

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