Are there gender, racial or relationship differences in caregiver task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes among stroke family caregivers?

Nenette M. Jessup, Tamilyn Bakas, Susan M. McLennon, Michael T. Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine differences in caregiver perceptions of task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes based on caregiver characteristics of gender, race and type of relationship to the person with stroke.

Methods: A sample of 243 stroke caregivers (females n = 191; males n = 52; non-African Americans n = 184; African Americans n = 59; non-spouses n = 127; spouses n = 116) were interviewed by telephone within 8 weeks of the survivor's discharge to home. Measures included the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) for task difficulty, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms and Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS) for life changes. Three general linear models computed differences in OCBS, PHQ9 and OCBS scores.

Results: Significant differences were found on the OCBS for females (p < 0.001) and African American spouses (p < 0.048); on the PHQ9 for females (p < 0.001), non-African Americans (p = 0.047), spouses (p = 0.003) and African-American spouses (p = 0.010); and on the BCOS for females (p = 0.008) and non-African Americans (p = 0.033).

Conclusions: Findings suggest that female and non-African American stroke caregivers are relatively more likely to experience task difficulty, depressive symptoms and negative life changes as a result of providing care. African American spouses were also at risk. Tailoring interventions based on caregivers' characteristics may improve outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Injury
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Spouses
Caregivers
African Americans
Stroke
Depression
Telephone
Survivors
Linear Models
Caregiving
Task Difficulty
Depressive Symptoms
Health
Burden

Keywords

  • Burden
  • Caregiver
  • Demographics
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Life changes
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Are there gender, racial or relationship differences in caregiver task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes among stroke family caregivers? / Jessup, Nenette M.; Bakas, Tamilyn; McLennon, Susan M.; Weaver, Michael T.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 17-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jessup, Nenette M. ; Bakas, Tamilyn ; McLennon, Susan M. ; Weaver, Michael T. / Are there gender, racial or relationship differences in caregiver task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes among stroke family caregivers?. In: Brain Injury. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 17-24.
@article{321db2b43c794d57b54e0c4e0960259a,
title = "Are there gender, racial or relationship differences in caregiver task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes among stroke family caregivers?",
abstract = "Objective: To examine differences in caregiver perceptions of task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes based on caregiver characteristics of gender, race and type of relationship to the person with stroke.Methods: A sample of 243 stroke caregivers (females n = 191; males n = 52; non-African Americans n = 184; African Americans n = 59; non-spouses n = 127; spouses n = 116) were interviewed by telephone within 8 weeks of the survivor's discharge to home. Measures included the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) for task difficulty, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms and Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS) for life changes. Three general linear models computed differences in OCBS, PHQ9 and OCBS scores.Results: Significant differences were found on the OCBS for females (p < 0.001) and African American spouses (p < 0.048); on the PHQ9 for females (p < 0.001), non-African Americans (p = 0.047), spouses (p = 0.003) and African-American spouses (p = 0.010); and on the BCOS for females (p = 0.008) and non-African Americans (p = 0.033).Conclusions: Findings suggest that female and non-African American stroke caregivers are relatively more likely to experience task difficulty, depressive symptoms and negative life changes as a result of providing care. African American spouses were also at risk. Tailoring interventions based on caregivers' characteristics may improve outcomes.",
keywords = "Burden, Caregiver, Demographics, Depressive symptoms, Life changes, Stroke",
author = "Jessup, {Nenette M.} and Tamilyn Bakas and McLennon, {Susan M.} and Weaver, {Michael T.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/02699052.2014.947631",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "17--24",
journal = "Brain Injury",
issn = "0269-9052",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are there gender, racial or relationship differences in caregiver task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes among stroke family caregivers?

AU - Jessup, Nenette M.

AU - Bakas, Tamilyn

AU - McLennon, Susan M.

AU - Weaver, Michael T.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Objective: To examine differences in caregiver perceptions of task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes based on caregiver characteristics of gender, race and type of relationship to the person with stroke.Methods: A sample of 243 stroke caregivers (females n = 191; males n = 52; non-African Americans n = 184; African Americans n = 59; non-spouses n = 127; spouses n = 116) were interviewed by telephone within 8 weeks of the survivor's discharge to home. Measures included the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) for task difficulty, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms and Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS) for life changes. Three general linear models computed differences in OCBS, PHQ9 and OCBS scores.Results: Significant differences were found on the OCBS for females (p < 0.001) and African American spouses (p < 0.048); on the PHQ9 for females (p < 0.001), non-African Americans (p = 0.047), spouses (p = 0.003) and African-American spouses (p = 0.010); and on the BCOS for females (p = 0.008) and non-African Americans (p = 0.033).Conclusions: Findings suggest that female and non-African American stroke caregivers are relatively more likely to experience task difficulty, depressive symptoms and negative life changes as a result of providing care. African American spouses were also at risk. Tailoring interventions based on caregivers' characteristics may improve outcomes.

AB - Objective: To examine differences in caregiver perceptions of task difficulty, depressive symptoms and life changes based on caregiver characteristics of gender, race and type of relationship to the person with stroke.Methods: A sample of 243 stroke caregivers (females n = 191; males n = 52; non-African Americans n = 184; African Americans n = 59; non-spouses n = 127; spouses n = 116) were interviewed by telephone within 8 weeks of the survivor's discharge to home. Measures included the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (OCBS) for task difficulty, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depressive symptoms and Bakas Caregiving Outcomes Scale (BCOS) for life changes. Three general linear models computed differences in OCBS, PHQ9 and OCBS scores.Results: Significant differences were found on the OCBS for females (p < 0.001) and African American spouses (p < 0.048); on the PHQ9 for females (p < 0.001), non-African Americans (p = 0.047), spouses (p = 0.003) and African-American spouses (p = 0.010); and on the BCOS for females (p = 0.008) and non-African Americans (p = 0.033).Conclusions: Findings suggest that female and non-African American stroke caregivers are relatively more likely to experience task difficulty, depressive symptoms and negative life changes as a result of providing care. African American spouses were also at risk. Tailoring interventions based on caregivers' characteristics may improve outcomes.

KW - Burden

KW - Caregiver

KW - Demographics

KW - Depressive symptoms

KW - Life changes

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84917710512&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84917710512&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/02699052.2014.947631

DO - 10.3109/02699052.2014.947631

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84917710512

VL - 29

SP - 17

EP - 24

JO - Brain Injury

JF - Brain Injury

SN - 0269-9052

IS - 1

ER -