Assessing radiology resident reporting skills

Kenneth B. Williamson, Jennifer L. Steele, Richard Gunderman, Terrence D. Wilkin, Robert D. Tarver, Valerie Jackson, Donald L. Kreipke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To develop an Objective Structured Clinical Examination for assessing the reporting skills of radiology residents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The approach used in this study derives from performance-based assessment, that is, tests in which actual performance of a skill is observed and measured. For this task, 29 radiology residents and five faculty members (n = 34) independently dictated reports regarding a set of 20 cases with radiographs in 1 hour. The task was performed in a controlled environment. Data were analyzed by using analysis of variance and tests for linear trends, with the expectation of increasing performance with increasing experience. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between subjects' experience and the mean number of cases completed (F = 4.46, P = .006), the mean number of well-specified impressions (F = 5.84, P = .001), and the mean number of urgent or discrepant findings noted (F = 3.67, P = .015). Results also demonstrated a clear linear trend of increasing performance with increasing experience with each variable (P = .002, <.001, and .002, respectively, for t tests with polynomial contrasts). CONCLUSION: The significant linear trends indicate that reporting skills increase with increasing experience in the program. This finding supports the validity of the measurement. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination provides a means of assessing radiology resident reporting skills.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-722
Number of pages4
JournalRadiology
Volume225
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Radiology
Controlled Environment
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Diagnostic radiology, observer performance
  • Radiology reporting systems Special Reports

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Williamson, K. B., Steele, J. L., Gunderman, R., Wilkin, T. D., Tarver, R. D., Jackson, V., & Kreipke, D. L. (2002). Assessing radiology resident reporting skills. Radiology, 225(3), 719-722.

Assessing radiology resident reporting skills. / Williamson, Kenneth B.; Steele, Jennifer L.; Gunderman, Richard; Wilkin, Terrence D.; Tarver, Robert D.; Jackson, Valerie; Kreipke, Donald L.

In: Radiology, Vol. 225, No. 3, 12.2002, p. 719-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williamson, KB, Steele, JL, Gunderman, R, Wilkin, TD, Tarver, RD, Jackson, V & Kreipke, DL 2002, 'Assessing radiology resident reporting skills', Radiology, vol. 225, no. 3, pp. 719-722.
Williamson KB, Steele JL, Gunderman R, Wilkin TD, Tarver RD, Jackson V et al. Assessing radiology resident reporting skills. Radiology. 2002 Dec;225(3):719-722.
Williamson, Kenneth B. ; Steele, Jennifer L. ; Gunderman, Richard ; Wilkin, Terrence D. ; Tarver, Robert D. ; Jackson, Valerie ; Kreipke, Donald L. / Assessing radiology resident reporting skills. In: Radiology. 2002 ; Vol. 225, No. 3. pp. 719-722.
@article{b184fd827df040588decbe1d733c261c,
title = "Assessing radiology resident reporting skills",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To develop an Objective Structured Clinical Examination for assessing the reporting skills of radiology residents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The approach used in this study derives from performance-based assessment, that is, tests in which actual performance of a skill is observed and measured. For this task, 29 radiology residents and five faculty members (n = 34) independently dictated reports regarding a set of 20 cases with radiographs in 1 hour. The task was performed in a controlled environment. Data were analyzed by using analysis of variance and tests for linear trends, with the expectation of increasing performance with increasing experience. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between subjects' experience and the mean number of cases completed (F = 4.46, P = .006), the mean number of well-specified impressions (F = 5.84, P = .001), and the mean number of urgent or discrepant findings noted (F = 3.67, P = .015). Results also demonstrated a clear linear trend of increasing performance with increasing experience with each variable (P = .002, <.001, and .002, respectively, for t tests with polynomial contrasts). CONCLUSION: The significant linear trends indicate that reporting skills increase with increasing experience in the program. This finding supports the validity of the measurement. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination provides a means of assessing radiology resident reporting skills.",
keywords = "Diagnostic radiology, observer performance, Radiology reporting systems Special Reports",
author = "Williamson, {Kenneth B.} and Steele, {Jennifer L.} and Richard Gunderman and Wilkin, {Terrence D.} and Tarver, {Robert D.} and Valerie Jackson and Kreipke, {Donald L.}",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
language = "English",
volume = "225",
pages = "719--722",
journal = "Radiology",
issn = "0033-8419",
publisher = "Radiological Society of North America Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing radiology resident reporting skills

AU - Williamson, Kenneth B.

AU - Steele, Jennifer L.

AU - Gunderman, Richard

AU - Wilkin, Terrence D.

AU - Tarver, Robert D.

AU - Jackson, Valerie

AU - Kreipke, Donald L.

PY - 2002/12

Y1 - 2002/12

N2 - PURPOSE: To develop an Objective Structured Clinical Examination for assessing the reporting skills of radiology residents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The approach used in this study derives from performance-based assessment, that is, tests in which actual performance of a skill is observed and measured. For this task, 29 radiology residents and five faculty members (n = 34) independently dictated reports regarding a set of 20 cases with radiographs in 1 hour. The task was performed in a controlled environment. Data were analyzed by using analysis of variance and tests for linear trends, with the expectation of increasing performance with increasing experience. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between subjects' experience and the mean number of cases completed (F = 4.46, P = .006), the mean number of well-specified impressions (F = 5.84, P = .001), and the mean number of urgent or discrepant findings noted (F = 3.67, P = .015). Results also demonstrated a clear linear trend of increasing performance with increasing experience with each variable (P = .002, <.001, and .002, respectively, for t tests with polynomial contrasts). CONCLUSION: The significant linear trends indicate that reporting skills increase with increasing experience in the program. This finding supports the validity of the measurement. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination provides a means of assessing radiology resident reporting skills.

AB - PURPOSE: To develop an Objective Structured Clinical Examination for assessing the reporting skills of radiology residents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The approach used in this study derives from performance-based assessment, that is, tests in which actual performance of a skill is observed and measured. For this task, 29 radiology residents and five faculty members (n = 34) independently dictated reports regarding a set of 20 cases with radiographs in 1 hour. The task was performed in a controlled environment. Data were analyzed by using analysis of variance and tests for linear trends, with the expectation of increasing performance with increasing experience. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between subjects' experience and the mean number of cases completed (F = 4.46, P = .006), the mean number of well-specified impressions (F = 5.84, P = .001), and the mean number of urgent or discrepant findings noted (F = 3.67, P = .015). Results also demonstrated a clear linear trend of increasing performance with increasing experience with each variable (P = .002, <.001, and .002, respectively, for t tests with polynomial contrasts). CONCLUSION: The significant linear trends indicate that reporting skills increase with increasing experience in the program. This finding supports the validity of the measurement. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination provides a means of assessing radiology resident reporting skills.

KW - Diagnostic radiology, observer performance

KW - Radiology reporting systems Special Reports

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036893498&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036893498&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 225

SP - 719

EP - 722

JO - Radiology

JF - Radiology

SN - 0033-8419

IS - 3

ER -