Assessment of the need for education and/or training in the dental care of people with handicaps.

Armando Soto, A. Cushing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey questionnaire was sent to members of the British Society of Dentistry for the Handicapped to investigate their opinions about the need for education and training of dentists in the delivery of oral care to people with handicaps. Their educational experience was explored. Views on education and training were investigated in relation to timing, content and methods. Three hundred and sixty five questionnaires were sent and the total response rate was 67.4 per cent. There was a higher percentage of females than males and a higher percentage of 30 to 39 year old subjects in the sample. The data were analysed using the 'Survey Plus' program. A high proportion of respondents thought there was a need for education and training of dentists in the delivery of care to people with handicaps (70 per cent). Their views on training provided information on three main issues: the type of training course, and the content and methods of training or education. In-service training, observation of other dentists and continuing education courses were opportunities that people considered would have helped them. Although views varied, there was a notable desire for contact with experienced clinicians, particularly the observation of them carrying out treatment, the opportunity for participating in teaching methods, discussions and problem-solving aids. The involvement of carers and of people with handicaps themselves was suggested. Undergraduate and postgraduate education were both considered important, although postgraduate training was the more highly favoured. In relation to the content of training, behaviour management, communication skills and appropriate treatment planning were most commonly identified. This information will be useful for those wishing to establish courses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-170
Number of pages6
JournalCommunity Dental Health
Volume9
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Needs Assessment
Dental Care
Education
Dentists
Dental Care for Disabled
Observation
Continuing Education
Caregivers
Teaching
Communication
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Assessment of the need for education and/or training in the dental care of people with handicaps. / Soto, Armando; Cushing, A.

In: Community Dental Health, Vol. 9, No. 2, 06.1992, p. 165-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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