Assessment of tissue and cell damage by succinate oxidation

Walter W. Jolly, Donavan D. Wilhelm, Robert Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Succinate and other citric acid cycle intermediates do not readily cross intact hepatic and cardiac cell membranes. When the plasma membrane is damaged, succinate enters the cell freely and is oxidized by the mitochondria with the production of fumarate and malate which diffuse out of the damaged cells. This forms the basis for a method described here for estimating the number of damaged cells in experimental liver and heart preparations. Perfused liver and heart show much less conversion of succinate to malate than less "intact" preparations such as isolated cells, slices, and homogenates. Damage to the liver by carbon tetrachloride poisoning greatly increases succinate conversion to malate by the perfused liver whereas coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion greatly increases succinate conversion to malate by the perfused heart. Reperfusion of ischemic heart tissue is followed by an almost immediate release of a large part of the creatine phosphokinase that will be lost from the tissue. The capacity to oxidize succinate to malate develops slowly, reaching maximal rates after most of the creatine phosphokinase has been released. The method should prove useful in evaluating: (a) cell viability in tissue slice and isolated cell preparations; (b) the sequence of events in cell necrosis; (c) whether an organ is suitable for transplantation; (d) the efficacy of methods of myocardial preservation in laboratory preparations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-500
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979

Fingerprint

Succinic Acid
Liver
Creatine Kinase
Reperfusion
Carbon Tetrachloride Poisoning
Cell Membrane
Fumarates
Citric Acid Cycle
Coronary Occlusion
Hepatocytes
Cell Survival
Coronary Vessels
Mitochondria
Necrosis
Cell Count
Transplantation
malic acid

Keywords

  • Creatine phosphokinase
  • Heart
  • Hepatocytes
  • Ischemia
  • Liver
  • Malate
  • Myocytes
  • Succinate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Assessment of tissue and cell damage by succinate oxidation. / Jolly, Walter W.; Wilhelm, Donavan D.; Harris, Robert.

In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Vol. 11, No. 5, 1979, p. 485-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jolly, Walter W. ; Wilhelm, Donavan D. ; Harris, Robert. / Assessment of tissue and cell damage by succinate oxidation. In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology. 1979 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 485-500.
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