Association between Cognitive Decline in Older Adults and Use of Primary Care Physician Services in Pennsylvania

Nicole Fowler, Lisa A. Morrow, Li Chuan Tu, Douglas P. Landsittel, Beth E. Snitz, Eric G. Rodriquez, Judith A. Saxton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the relationship between cognitive decline of older patients (≥ 65 y) and use of primary care physician (PCP) services over 24 months. Design: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a cluster randomized trial that took place from 2006-2010 and investigated the relationship between formal neuropsychological evaluation and patient outcomes in primary care. Setting: Twenty-four PCPs in 11 practices in southwestern Pennsylvania. Most practices were suburban and included more than 5 PCPs. Participants: A sample of 423 primary care patients 65 years old or older. Measurements: The association between the number of PCP visits and a decline in cognitive status, as determined by multivariable analyses that controlled for patient-level, physician-level, and practice-level factors (eg, patient age, comorbidities, and symptoms of depression; practice location and size; PCP age and sex) and used a linear mixed model with a random intercept to adjust for clustering. Results: Over a 2-year follow-up, 199 patients (47.0%) experienced a decline in cognitive status. Patients with a cognitive decline had a mean of 0.69 more PCP visits than did patients without a cognitive decline (P <.05). Conclusions: Early signs of cognitive decline may be an indicator of greater use of primary care. Given the demographic trends, more PCPs are likely to be needed to meet the increasing needs of the older population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-209
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of primary care & community health
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Care Physicians
Primary Health Care
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cluster Analysis
Comorbidity
Linear Models
Demography
Depression
Physicians
Population

Keywords

  • cognitive and psychological function
  • comorbidity
  • older adults
  • primary care
  • use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Community and Home Care
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Association between Cognitive Decline in Older Adults and Use of Primary Care Physician Services in Pennsylvania. / Fowler, Nicole; Morrow, Lisa A.; Tu, Li Chuan; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Snitz, Beth E.; Rodriquez, Eric G.; Saxton, Judith A.

In: Journal of primary care & community health, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2012, p. 201-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fowler, Nicole ; Morrow, Lisa A. ; Tu, Li Chuan ; Landsittel, Douglas P. ; Snitz, Beth E. ; Rodriquez, Eric G. ; Saxton, Judith A. / Association between Cognitive Decline in Older Adults and Use of Primary Care Physician Services in Pennsylvania. In: Journal of primary care & community health. 2012 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 201-209.
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