Association between patient race/ethnicity and perceived interpersonal aspects of care in the emergency department

Sun Lee Jin, Joshua Tamayo-Sarver, Patricia Kinneer, Cherri Hobgood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To determine if perceptions of interpersonal aspects of care in the emergency department (ED) vary by patient race/ethnicity. Methods: Patients in a tertiary care academic ED responded to a 22-question survey focusing on interpersonal care aspects: affiliation, satisfaction, trust and participation. Scores for each of the four generated scales were compared in terms of race, ethnicity and other basic demographics. Results: African-American patients demonstrated significantly lower mean scores for trust of healthcare providers than Caucasians and significantly lower levels of participation. African-American race/ethnicity continued to be a significant predictor of lower levels of trust (but not participation) after accounting for age, gender, education, household income, health insurance, healthcare received in last six months and route of referral to the ED. Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that African Americans may feel less trust toward their ED providers. Understanding this phenomenon and teaching providers how to reduce distrust may translate into better patient compliance/outcomes and reduce healthcare disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-85
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume100
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Emergency care
  • Patient-physician relationship
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Association between patient race/ethnicity and perceived interpersonal aspects of care in the emergency department'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this