Association of added sugar intake and caries-related experiences among individuals of Mexican origin

S. Vega-López, N. M. Lindberg, G. J. Eckert, E. L. Nicholson, Gerardo Maupome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Determine the association between key dental outcomes and added sugar intake using a survey instrument to assess added sugars, which was specifically tailored to immigrant and US-born adults of Mexican origin. Methods: Hispanic adults of Mexican origin (n = 326; 36.2 ± 12.1 years) completed a self-administered survey to gather acculturation, self-reported dental experiences and self-care practices (eg brushing, flossing, pain, bleeding gums), and socio-demographic information. The survey included a culturally tailored 22-item Added Sugar Intake Estimate (ASIE) that assessed added sugar intake from processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages in a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire format. Linear regression, 2-sample t test, and ANOVA were used to evaluate associations of demographic and dental outcomes with daily added sugar intake. Results: Of the mean total daily added sugar intake (99.6 ± 94.6 g), 36.5 ± 44.4 g was derived from sugar-containing foods and snacks, and 63.1 ± 68.2 g from beverages. Participants who reported greater added sugar intake were more likely to have reported the presence of a toothache in the preceding 12 months, having been prescribed antibiotics for dental reasons, being less likely to floss daily, have reported eating or drinking within 1 hour before bed and have lower psychological acculturation (P < .05 for all). Results were comparable when assessing intake from sugar-containing foods/snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages. Conclusions: This study confirmed the association between added sugar intake and self-reported dental outcomes among adults of Mexican origin and points to an urgent need to improve dietary behaviours in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Tooth
Beverages
Acculturation
Snacks
Eating
Toothache
Demography
Gingiva
Self Care
Hispanic Americans
Drinking
Linear Models
Analysis of Variance
Hemorrhage
Psychology
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pain
Food
Surveys and Questionnaires
Population

Keywords

  • Added sugars
  • Dental caries
  • Mexican-American
  • Oral health
  • Self-care behaviours

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Association of added sugar intake and caries-related experiences among individuals of Mexican origin. / Vega-López, S.; Lindberg, N. M.; Eckert, G. J.; Nicholson, E. L.; Maupome, Gerardo.

In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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