Association of greater intravenous volume infusion with shorter hospitalization for patients with post-ERCP pancreatitis

Sashidhar V. Sagi, Suzette Schmidt, Evan Fogel, Glen Lehman, Lee McHenry, Stuart Sherman, James Watkins, Gregory A. Coté

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Aim: There are no data specifically correlating early intravenous volume infusion (IVI) with the length of hospitalization for postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP). Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted within 24h after ERCP to our institute with PEP. IVI during the first 24h after ERCP was assessed. Primary outcome was severity of PEP, defined by length of hospitalization according to consensus guidelines: mild≤3, moderate 4-10, and severe>10 days. Results: Of 72 eligible patients, 41 (56.9%) had mild and 31 (43.1%) moderate/severe PEP. Both groups had comparable demographics, indications, and procedural factors except patients with moderate/severe PEP were older (median age 49 vs 36 years, P=0.05) and more likely to be discharged and readmitted within the first 24h (41.9% vs 14.6%, P<0.01). Patients with mild PEP received significantly greater IVI during the first 24h (2834mL [2046, 3570] vs 2044mL [1227, 2875], P<0.02) and 50% more fluid post-ERCP (2270mL [1435, 2961] vs 1515 [950-2350], P<0.02) compared with those with at least moderate PEP. Conclusion: In patients with PEP, greater IVI during the first 24h after ERCP is associated with reduced length of hospitalization. Lower IVI was more commonly observed in individuals who were discharged and then readmitted during the first 24h.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1316-1320
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia)
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography
Intravenous Infusions
Pancreatitis
Hospitalization
Peptamen
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Demography
Guidelines

Keywords

  • Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography
  • Intravenous infusion
  • Pancreatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology
  • Medicine(all)

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Association of greater intravenous volume infusion with shorter hospitalization for patients with post-ERCP pancreatitis. / Sagi, Sashidhar V.; Schmidt, Suzette; Fogel, Evan; Lehman, Glen; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Watkins, James; Coté, Gregory A.

In: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), Vol. 29, No. 6, 2014, p. 1316-1320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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