Association of lymphocytic colitis and lactase deficiency in pediatric population

Jihong Sun, Jingmei Lin, Kalayan Parashette, Jianjun Zhang , Rong Fan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Characterized by colonic mucosa intraepithelial lymphocytosis, lymphocytic colitis is primarily an entity presented in the middle-aged to elderly patient population. Very few large series of lymphocytic colitis of childhood occurrence are available in the medical literature. Ten cases each of lymphocytic colitis and of colonic lymphocytosis of other diagnosis, all with duodenal disaccharidases analysis data, were collected from the files of our institution. The electronic medical records were reviewed and multiple variables were analyzed. The ten patients with lymphocytic colitis presented with diarrhea. Of these, three had abdominal pain. The age range was 2-18 years. Nearly all patients were Caucasian (90%) and 70% were female. Endoscopically, most had normal appearing colonic mucosa. Significant past medical history, family medical history and associated comorbidities included celiac disease, Down syndrome, juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the most revealing observation was that the majority of cases (80%) were associated with lactase deficiency and, for the most part, gastrointestinal symptoms improved simply by treatment with Lactaid or avoidance of dairy products. This association is statistically significant. Our clinicopathological study indicates that the typical pediatric patient is a female Caucasian. A large of portion of the patients had associated lactase deficiency and improved on Lactaid supplement alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-144
Number of pages7
JournalPathology Research and Practice
Volume211
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Lymphocytic Colitis
Lactase
Pediatrics
Lymphocytosis
Population
beta-Galactosidase
Mucous Membrane
Medical History Taking
Disaccharidases
Dairy Products
Juvenile Arthritis
Electronic Health Records
Celiac Disease
Down Syndrome
Abdominal Pain
Autoimmune Diseases
Comorbidity
Diarrhea
Observation

Keywords

  • Chronic diarrhea
  • Lactase deficiency
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Lymphocytic colitis
  • Microscopic colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Association of lymphocytic colitis and lactase deficiency in pediatric population. / Sun, Jihong; Lin, Jingmei; Parashette, Kalayan; Zhang , Jianjun; Fan, Rong.

In: Pathology Research and Practice, Vol. 211, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 138-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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