Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) survey of program selection, knowledge acquisition, and education provided as viewed by vascular trainees from two different training paradigms

Michael Dalsing, Michel S. Makaroun, Linda M. Harris, Joseph L. Mills, John Eidt, George J. Eckert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methods of learning may differ between generations and even the level of training or the training paradigm, or both. To optimize education, it is important to optimize training designs, and the perspective of those being trained can aid in this quest. The Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery leadership sent a survey to all vascular surgical trainees (integrated [0/5], independent current and new graduates [5 + 2]) addressing various aspects of the educational experience. Of 412 surveys sent, 163 (∼40%) responded: 46 integrated, 96 fellows, and 21 graduates. The survey was completed by 52% of the integrated residents, 59% of the independent residents, and 20% of the graduates. When choosing a program for training, the integrated residents are most concerned with program atmosphere and the independent residents with total clinical volume. Concerns after training were thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm procedures and business aspects: 40% to 50% integrated, and 60% fellows/graduates. Integrated trainees found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (79%), with 9% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory and venous training were judged "just right" by 87% and ∼71%, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 82% felt it prevented fatigue, and 24% thought it was detrimental to patient care. Independent program trainees also found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (71%), with 12% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory/venous training were "just right" by 87% and 60% to 70%, respectively, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (∼65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 62% felt it was detrimental to patient care, and 42% felt it prevented fatigue. A supportive environment and adequate clinical volume will attract trainees to a program. For "an urgent need to know," the integrated trainees are especially turning to online texts rather than traditional textbooks, which suggests an opportunity for a shift in educational focus. Point-of-care is the best time for education and feedback, suggesting a continued need for dedicated faculty. The business side of training is underserved and should be addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)588-597
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

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Blood Vessels
Education
Fatigue
Patient Care
Point-of-Care Systems
Textbooks
Atmosphere
Aneurysm
Thorax
Learning
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) survey of program selection, knowledge acquisition, and education provided as viewed by vascular trainees from two different training paradigms. / Dalsing, Michael; Makaroun, Michel S.; Harris, Linda M.; Mills, Joseph L.; Eidt, John; Eckert, George J.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 55, No. 2, 02.2012, p. 588-597.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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