Association of self-reported sleep and circadian measures with glycemia in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed untreated type 2 diabetes

Babak Mokhlesi, Karla A. Temple, Ashley H. Tjaden, Sharon L. Edelstein, Kristina M. Utzschneider, Kristen J. Nadeau, Tamara Hannon, Susan Sam, Elena Barengolts, Shalini Manchanda, David A. Ehrmann, Eve Van Cauter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Sleep disturbances and circadian misalignment (social jet lag, late chronotype, or shift work) have been associated with worse glycemic control in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whether these findings apply to adults with prediabetes is yet unexplored. Wehypothesized that self-reported short sleep, poor sleep quality, and/or circadian misalignment are associated with higher glycemia, BMI, and blood pressure (BP) in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our cohort included 962 overweight/obese adults ages 20-65 years with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D who completed a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test and validated sleep questionnaires. Independent associations of sleep and circadian variables with glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. RESULTS The multiethnic cohort was 55% men, with mean6SD age 52.269.5 years and BMI 34.7 6 5.5 kg/m2. Mean sleep duration was 6.6 6 1.3 h. Poor sleep quality was reported by 54% and high risk for obstructive sleep apnea by 64%. HbA1c was significantly higher in those reporting <5or >8 h sleep per night. Sleep duration >8h was also associated with higher fasting glucose and <6 h with higher BMI. Shift work was also associated with higher BMI. Social jet lag and delayed chronotype were associated with higher BP. CONCLUSIONS In our cohort, self-reported short and long sleep were both associated with adverse measures of glycemia, and short sleep and shift work were associated with higher BMI. Further research using objective measures of sleep is needed to better delineate the relationship between sleep and glycemia in adults with prediabetes or T2D.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1326-1332
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes care
Volume42
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Prediabetic State
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Sleep
Blood Pressure
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Glucose Tolerance Test
Fasting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Mokhlesi, B., Temple, K. A., Tjaden, A. H., Edelstein, S. L., Utzschneider, K. M., Nadeau, K. J., ... Van Cauter, E. (2019). Association of self-reported sleep and circadian measures with glycemia in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed untreated type 2 diabetes. Diabetes care, 42(7), 1326-1332. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc19-0298

Association of self-reported sleep and circadian measures with glycemia in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed untreated type 2 diabetes. / Mokhlesi, Babak; Temple, Karla A.; Tjaden, Ashley H.; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Utzschneider, Kristina M.; Nadeau, Kristen J.; Hannon, Tamara; Sam, Susan; Barengolts, Elena; Manchanda, Shalini; Ehrmann, David A.; Van Cauter, Eve.

In: Diabetes care, Vol. 42, No. 7, 01.01.2019, p. 1326-1332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mokhlesi, B, Temple, KA, Tjaden, AH, Edelstein, SL, Utzschneider, KM, Nadeau, KJ, Hannon, T, Sam, S, Barengolts, E, Manchanda, S, Ehrmann, DA & Van Cauter, E 2019, 'Association of self-reported sleep and circadian measures with glycemia in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed untreated type 2 diabetes', Diabetes care, vol. 42, no. 7, pp. 1326-1332. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc19-0298
Mokhlesi, Babak ; Temple, Karla A. ; Tjaden, Ashley H. ; Edelstein, Sharon L. ; Utzschneider, Kristina M. ; Nadeau, Kristen J. ; Hannon, Tamara ; Sam, Susan ; Barengolts, Elena ; Manchanda, Shalini ; Ehrmann, David A. ; Van Cauter, Eve. / Association of self-reported sleep and circadian measures with glycemia in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed untreated type 2 diabetes. In: Diabetes care. 2019 ; Vol. 42, No. 7. pp. 1326-1332.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE Sleep disturbances and circadian misalignment (social jet lag, late chronotype, or shift work) have been associated with worse glycemic control in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whether these findings apply to adults with prediabetes is yet unexplored. Wehypothesized that self-reported short sleep, poor sleep quality, and/or circadian misalignment are associated with higher glycemia, BMI, and blood pressure (BP) in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our cohort included 962 overweight/obese adults ages 20-65 years with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D who completed a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test and validated sleep questionnaires. Independent associations of sleep and circadian variables with glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. RESULTS The multiethnic cohort was 55{\%} men, with mean6SD age 52.269.5 years and BMI 34.7 6 5.5 kg/m2. Mean sleep duration was 6.6 6 1.3 h. Poor sleep quality was reported by 54{\%} and high risk for obstructive sleep apnea by 64{\%}. HbA1c was significantly higher in those reporting <5or >8 h sleep per night. Sleep duration >8h was also associated with higher fasting glucose and <6 h with higher BMI. Shift work was also associated with higher BMI. Social jet lag and delayed chronotype were associated with higher BP. CONCLUSIONS In our cohort, self-reported short and long sleep were both associated with adverse measures of glycemia, and short sleep and shift work were associated with higher BMI. Further research using objective measures of sleep is needed to better delineate the relationship between sleep and glycemia in adults with prediabetes or T2D.",
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T1 - Association of self-reported sleep and circadian measures with glycemia in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed untreated type 2 diabetes

AU - Mokhlesi, Babak

AU - Temple, Karla A.

AU - Tjaden, Ashley H.

AU - Edelstein, Sharon L.

AU - Utzschneider, Kristina M.

AU - Nadeau, Kristen J.

AU - Hannon, Tamara

AU - Sam, Susan

AU - Barengolts, Elena

AU - Manchanda, Shalini

AU - Ehrmann, David A.

AU - Van Cauter, Eve

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE Sleep disturbances and circadian misalignment (social jet lag, late chronotype, or shift work) have been associated with worse glycemic control in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whether these findings apply to adults with prediabetes is yet unexplored. Wehypothesized that self-reported short sleep, poor sleep quality, and/or circadian misalignment are associated with higher glycemia, BMI, and blood pressure (BP) in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our cohort included 962 overweight/obese adults ages 20-65 years with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D who completed a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test and validated sleep questionnaires. Independent associations of sleep and circadian variables with glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. RESULTS The multiethnic cohort was 55% men, with mean6SD age 52.269.5 years and BMI 34.7 6 5.5 kg/m2. Mean sleep duration was 6.6 6 1.3 h. Poor sleep quality was reported by 54% and high risk for obstructive sleep apnea by 64%. HbA1c was significantly higher in those reporting <5or >8 h sleep per night. Sleep duration >8h was also associated with higher fasting glucose and <6 h with higher BMI. Shift work was also associated with higher BMI. Social jet lag and delayed chronotype were associated with higher BP. CONCLUSIONS In our cohort, self-reported short and long sleep were both associated with adverse measures of glycemia, and short sleep and shift work were associated with higher BMI. Further research using objective measures of sleep is needed to better delineate the relationship between sleep and glycemia in adults with prediabetes or T2D.

AB - OBJECTIVE Sleep disturbances and circadian misalignment (social jet lag, late chronotype, or shift work) have been associated with worse glycemic control in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whether these findings apply to adults with prediabetes is yet unexplored. Wehypothesized that self-reported short sleep, poor sleep quality, and/or circadian misalignment are associated with higher glycemia, BMI, and blood pressure (BP) in adults with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our cohort included 962 overweight/obese adults ages 20-65 years with prediabetes or recently diagnosed, untreated T2D who completed a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test and validated sleep questionnaires. Independent associations of sleep and circadian variables with glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. RESULTS The multiethnic cohort was 55% men, with mean6SD age 52.269.5 years and BMI 34.7 6 5.5 kg/m2. Mean sleep duration was 6.6 6 1.3 h. Poor sleep quality was reported by 54% and high risk for obstructive sleep apnea by 64%. HbA1c was significantly higher in those reporting <5or >8 h sleep per night. Sleep duration >8h was also associated with higher fasting glucose and <6 h with higher BMI. Shift work was also associated with higher BMI. Social jet lag and delayed chronotype were associated with higher BP. CONCLUSIONS In our cohort, self-reported short and long sleep were both associated with adverse measures of glycemia, and short sleep and shift work were associated with higher BMI. Further research using objective measures of sleep is needed to better delineate the relationship between sleep and glycemia in adults with prediabetes or T2D.

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