Associations between Depression, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Cognitively-Defined Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Subgroups

the Executive Prominent AD (EPAD) investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentation among people with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). We have categorized people with LOAD into subgroups based on relative impairments across cognitive domains. These 6 groups are people with no relatively impaired domains (AD-No Domains), 4 groups with one relatively impaired domain (AD-Memory, AD-Executive, AD-Language, and AD-Visuospatial), and a group with multiple relatively impaired domains (AD-Multiple Domains). Our previous analysis demonstrated that genetic factors vary across cognitively-defined LOAD groups. Objective: To determine whether risks associated with depression and traumatic brain injury with loss of consciousness (TBI) for cognitively defined LOAD subgroups are similar. Methods: We used cognitive data at LOAD diagnosis from three prospective cohort studies to determine cognitively-defined subgroups. We compared subgroups in endorsement of items from the Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale and history of TBI. Results: Among 1,505 people with LOAD from the three studies, there were substantial differences across subgroups in total CES-D score, with lower scores (less depression) for people with AD with relative impairments in memory (AD-Memory) compared to those in other groups. Differences were noteworthy for the sleep-related item of the CES-D, as people with AD-Memory were less likely to report restless sleep than people in other groups. There were no differences in TBI history across groups. Conclusions: Differences in risk factor associations across subgroups such as differences in endorsement of depression symptoms and restless sleep provide support for the hypothesis that there are biologically coherent subgroups of AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-617
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Alzheimer Disease
Depression
Epidemiologic Studies
Sleep
Unconsciousness
Traumatic Brain Injury
Cohort Studies
Language
History
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • cognitively-defined Alzheimer's disease subgroups
  • depression
  • psychometrics
  • restless sleep
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Associations between Depression, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Cognitively-Defined Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Subgroups. / the Executive Prominent AD (EPAD) investigators.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 70, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 609-617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentation among people with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). We have categorized people with LOAD into subgroups based on relative impairments across cognitive domains. These 6 groups are people with no relatively impaired domains (AD-No Domains), 4 groups with one relatively impaired domain (AD-Memory, AD-Executive, AD-Language, and AD-Visuospatial), and a group with multiple relatively impaired domains (AD-Multiple Domains). Our previous analysis demonstrated that genetic factors vary across cognitively-defined LOAD groups. Objective: To determine whether risks associated with depression and traumatic brain injury with loss of consciousness (TBI) for cognitively defined LOAD subgroups are similar. Methods: We used cognitive data at LOAD diagnosis from three prospective cohort studies to determine cognitively-defined subgroups. We compared subgroups in endorsement of items from the Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale and history of TBI. Results: Among 1,505 people with LOAD from the three studies, there were substantial differences across subgroups in total CES-D score, with lower scores (less depression) for people with AD with relative impairments in memory (AD-Memory) compared to those in other groups. Differences were noteworthy for the sleep-related item of the CES-D, as people with AD-Memory were less likely to report restless sleep than people in other groups. There were no differences in TBI history across groups. Conclusions: Differences in risk factor associations across subgroups such as differences in endorsement of depression symptoms and restless sleep provide support for the hypothesis that there are biologically coherent subgroups of AD.",
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T1 - Associations between Depression, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Cognitively-Defined Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Subgroups

AU - the Executive Prominent AD (EPAD) investigators

AU - Bauman, Julianna

AU - Gibbons, Laura E.

AU - Moore, MacKenzie

AU - Mukherjee, Shubhabrata

AU - McCurry, Susan M.

AU - McCormick, Wayne

AU - Bowen, James D.

AU - Trittschuh, Emily

AU - Glymour, Maria

AU - Mez, Jesse

AU - Saykin, Andrew

AU - Dams-O'Conner, Kristen

AU - Bennett, David A.

AU - Larson, Eric B.

AU - Crane, Paul K.

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N2 - Background: There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentation among people with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). We have categorized people with LOAD into subgroups based on relative impairments across cognitive domains. These 6 groups are people with no relatively impaired domains (AD-No Domains), 4 groups with one relatively impaired domain (AD-Memory, AD-Executive, AD-Language, and AD-Visuospatial), and a group with multiple relatively impaired domains (AD-Multiple Domains). Our previous analysis demonstrated that genetic factors vary across cognitively-defined LOAD groups. Objective: To determine whether risks associated with depression and traumatic brain injury with loss of consciousness (TBI) for cognitively defined LOAD subgroups are similar. Methods: We used cognitive data at LOAD diagnosis from three prospective cohort studies to determine cognitively-defined subgroups. We compared subgroups in endorsement of items from the Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale and history of TBI. Results: Among 1,505 people with LOAD from the three studies, there were substantial differences across subgroups in total CES-D score, with lower scores (less depression) for people with AD with relative impairments in memory (AD-Memory) compared to those in other groups. Differences were noteworthy for the sleep-related item of the CES-D, as people with AD-Memory were less likely to report restless sleep than people in other groups. There were no differences in TBI history across groups. Conclusions: Differences in risk factor associations across subgroups such as differences in endorsement of depression symptoms and restless sleep provide support for the hypothesis that there are biologically coherent subgroups of AD.

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