Asthma deaths outside the hospital in an urban community from 2004 to 2008

Maaz Mohiuddin, Michael C. Zacharisen, Christopher Poulos, Michael B. Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Several studies have been performed reviewing medical examiner's autopsy reports of asthma deaths. None, to our knowledge, have focused on the characteristics of asthma deaths in the urban community alone. Objective: To characterize factors related to asthma deaths occurring outside the hospital setting in an urban community. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 22 patients who died outside the hospital of asthma and underwent autopsy performed by the Milwaukee County medical examiner from 2004 to 2008. Results: The mean age of the patients was 32 years (range, 12-71 years), 11 patients were male, and 14 patients (64%) were African American. Seventeen patients (77%) died during the night or shortly on awakening. Twelve patients (55%) died in June, July, or August. A history of illicit drug, alcohol, or tobacco use was discovered in 13 patients (59%). Toxicologic test results for drugs of abuse were positive in 4 patients (18%). Twenty patients were using or overusing a short-acting β-agonist, 1 patient was taking omalizumab, and none were taking long-acting β-agonists alone. Two patients were taking no medications. Asthma severity and medication adherence were not consistently reported. Lung pathologic testing revealed eosinophils in 18 patients and a lack of neutrophils in every case. Conclusion: In this small and limited series of asthma deaths occurring in an urban setting outside the hospital, individuals were more likely to be African Americans, with deaths occurring more frequently at night, during the summer months, and in those with substance abuse and not taking anti-inflammatory asthma medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-417
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume108
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urban Hospitals
Asthma
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Street Drugs
African Americans
Autopsy
Medication Adherence
Tobacco Use
Eosinophils
Substance-Related Disorders
Medical Records
Neutrophils
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Alcohols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Asthma deaths outside the hospital in an urban community from 2004 to 2008. / Mohiuddin, Maaz; Zacharisen, Michael C.; Poulos, Christopher; Levy, Michael B.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 108, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 412-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohiuddin, Maaz ; Zacharisen, Michael C. ; Poulos, Christopher ; Levy, Michael B. / Asthma deaths outside the hospital in an urban community from 2004 to 2008. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2012 ; Vol. 108, No. 6. pp. 412-417.
@article{fa0f72c3c5e54331ab4d5b733f427ff5,
title = "Asthma deaths outside the hospital in an urban community from 2004 to 2008",
abstract = "Background: Several studies have been performed reviewing medical examiner's autopsy reports of asthma deaths. None, to our knowledge, have focused on the characteristics of asthma deaths in the urban community alone. Objective: To characterize factors related to asthma deaths occurring outside the hospital setting in an urban community. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 22 patients who died outside the hospital of asthma and underwent autopsy performed by the Milwaukee County medical examiner from 2004 to 2008. Results: The mean age of the patients was 32 years (range, 12-71 years), 11 patients were male, and 14 patients (64{\%}) were African American. Seventeen patients (77{\%}) died during the night or shortly on awakening. Twelve patients (55{\%}) died in June, July, or August. A history of illicit drug, alcohol, or tobacco use was discovered in 13 patients (59{\%}). Toxicologic test results for drugs of abuse were positive in 4 patients (18{\%}). Twenty patients were using or overusing a short-acting β-agonist, 1 patient was taking omalizumab, and none were taking long-acting β-agonists alone. Two patients were taking no medications. Asthma severity and medication adherence were not consistently reported. Lung pathologic testing revealed eosinophils in 18 patients and a lack of neutrophils in every case. Conclusion: In this small and limited series of asthma deaths occurring in an urban setting outside the hospital, individuals were more likely to be African Americans, with deaths occurring more frequently at night, during the summer months, and in those with substance abuse and not taking anti-inflammatory asthma medications.",
author = "Maaz Mohiuddin and Zacharisen, {Michael C.} and Christopher Poulos and Levy, {Michael B.}",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.anai.2012.03.016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "108",
pages = "412--417",
journal = "Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
issn = "1081-1206",
publisher = "American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Asthma deaths outside the hospital in an urban community from 2004 to 2008

AU - Mohiuddin, Maaz

AU - Zacharisen, Michael C.

AU - Poulos, Christopher

AU - Levy, Michael B.

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - Background: Several studies have been performed reviewing medical examiner's autopsy reports of asthma deaths. None, to our knowledge, have focused on the characteristics of asthma deaths in the urban community alone. Objective: To characterize factors related to asthma deaths occurring outside the hospital setting in an urban community. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 22 patients who died outside the hospital of asthma and underwent autopsy performed by the Milwaukee County medical examiner from 2004 to 2008. Results: The mean age of the patients was 32 years (range, 12-71 years), 11 patients were male, and 14 patients (64%) were African American. Seventeen patients (77%) died during the night or shortly on awakening. Twelve patients (55%) died in June, July, or August. A history of illicit drug, alcohol, or tobacco use was discovered in 13 patients (59%). Toxicologic test results for drugs of abuse were positive in 4 patients (18%). Twenty patients were using or overusing a short-acting β-agonist, 1 patient was taking omalizumab, and none were taking long-acting β-agonists alone. Two patients were taking no medications. Asthma severity and medication adherence were not consistently reported. Lung pathologic testing revealed eosinophils in 18 patients and a lack of neutrophils in every case. Conclusion: In this small and limited series of asthma deaths occurring in an urban setting outside the hospital, individuals were more likely to be African Americans, with deaths occurring more frequently at night, during the summer months, and in those with substance abuse and not taking anti-inflammatory asthma medications.

AB - Background: Several studies have been performed reviewing medical examiner's autopsy reports of asthma deaths. None, to our knowledge, have focused on the characteristics of asthma deaths in the urban community alone. Objective: To characterize factors related to asthma deaths occurring outside the hospital setting in an urban community. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 22 patients who died outside the hospital of asthma and underwent autopsy performed by the Milwaukee County medical examiner from 2004 to 2008. Results: The mean age of the patients was 32 years (range, 12-71 years), 11 patients were male, and 14 patients (64%) were African American. Seventeen patients (77%) died during the night or shortly on awakening. Twelve patients (55%) died in June, July, or August. A history of illicit drug, alcohol, or tobacco use was discovered in 13 patients (59%). Toxicologic test results for drugs of abuse were positive in 4 patients (18%). Twenty patients were using or overusing a short-acting β-agonist, 1 patient was taking omalizumab, and none were taking long-acting β-agonists alone. Two patients were taking no medications. Asthma severity and medication adherence were not consistently reported. Lung pathologic testing revealed eosinophils in 18 patients and a lack of neutrophils in every case. Conclusion: In this small and limited series of asthma deaths occurring in an urban setting outside the hospital, individuals were more likely to be African Americans, with deaths occurring more frequently at night, during the summer months, and in those with substance abuse and not taking anti-inflammatory asthma medications.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861541714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861541714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.anai.2012.03.016

DO - 10.1016/j.anai.2012.03.016

M3 - Article

C2 - 22626593

AN - SCOPUS:84861541714

VL - 108

SP - 412

EP - 417

JO - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

JF - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

SN - 1081-1206

IS - 6

ER -