Attitudes of pediatric urologists regarding sports participation by children with a solitary kidney

David S. Sharp, Jonathan H. Ross, Robert Kay, Richard Rink, Jonathan Ross, Greg Emmert, Anthony Casale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Little data are available regarding sports participation and appropriate long-term followup of children with a solitary kidney. We determine the current practice patterns and recommendations among pediatric urologists regarding sports participation and followup of these patients. Materials and Methods: A survey was mailed to the 231 active members of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Urology. The survey included questions regarding counseling of patients with a solitary kidney and physician estimates of long-term risk to overall renal function. Results: Of the 231 surveys 182 were returned for an overall response rate of 79%. Of the respondents 68% recommend that patients with a solitary kidney avoid contact sports. Recommendations in regard to participation in contact sports were further stratified as strongly against participation (27%), against participation with rare exceptions (30%), no recommendation either way (14%), allow participation (25%) and no restrictions be made (4%). Of the respondents 88% agreed that the estimated risk of renal loss from a child participating regularly in contact sports is less than 1% and 60% recommended special medical followup. Conclusions: Despite the consensus that the risk of renal injury in contact sports is low, a significant number of pediatric urologists advise avoidance. There appears to be a lack of consensus regarding long-term medical surveillance of these patients. Studies designed to obtain accurate clinical data regarding these issues are warranted to establish evidence based guidelines for the long-term treatment of children with a solitary kidney.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1811-1815
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume168
Issue number4 II
StatePublished - Oct 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Sports
Pediatrics
Kidney
Consensus
Patient Participation
Urology
Youth Sports
Urologists
Counseling
Surveys and Questionnaires
Guidelines
Physicians
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Kidney, pediatrics, urology
  • Sports, wounds and injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Sharp, D. S., Ross, J. H., Kay, R., Rink, R., Ross, J., Emmert, G., & Casale, A. (2002). Attitudes of pediatric urologists regarding sports participation by children with a solitary kidney. Journal of Urology, 168(4 II), 1811-1815.

Attitudes of pediatric urologists regarding sports participation by children with a solitary kidney. / Sharp, David S.; Ross, Jonathan H.; Kay, Robert; Rink, Richard; Ross, Jonathan; Emmert, Greg; Casale, Anthony.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 168, No. 4 II, 10.2002, p. 1811-1815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharp, DS, Ross, JH, Kay, R, Rink, R, Ross, J, Emmert, G & Casale, A 2002, 'Attitudes of pediatric urologists regarding sports participation by children with a solitary kidney', Journal of Urology, vol. 168, no. 4 II, pp. 1811-1815.
Sharp DS, Ross JH, Kay R, Rink R, Ross J, Emmert G et al. Attitudes of pediatric urologists regarding sports participation by children with a solitary kidney. Journal of Urology. 2002 Oct;168(4 II):1811-1815.
Sharp, David S. ; Ross, Jonathan H. ; Kay, Robert ; Rink, Richard ; Ross, Jonathan ; Emmert, Greg ; Casale, Anthony. / Attitudes of pediatric urologists regarding sports participation by children with a solitary kidney. In: Journal of Urology. 2002 ; Vol. 168, No. 4 II. pp. 1811-1815.
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