Attitudes toward HIV-infected individuals and infection control practices among a group of dentists in mexico city - A 1999 update of the 1992 survey

Gerardo Maupome, S. Aída Borges-Yáez, F. Javier Díez-de-Bonilla, María Esther Irigoyen-Camacho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The teaching of infection control (IC) was introduced at dental schools in Mexico during the 1990s. A 1992 survey indicated that some dentists had limited access to current IC standards. Deficient knowledge of bloodborne pathogens may influence dentists' attitudes about infected individuals and reduce compliance with IC recommendations. Objective: To update the 1992 appraisal of attitudes about persons infected with HIV or the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and IC knowledge and practices in a nonrepresentative sample of dentists in Mexico City. Method: One hundred eighty dentists were interviewed in 1999 (response rate, 84.1%) with the same methods used in 1992. Results: Seventy-nine percent of respondents perceived the risk of HIV infection as "considerable" to "very strong." The risk of HBV infection was considered higher than that of HIV. Only 32% of respondents had not been immunized against HBV. Reported use of personal protective equipment remained high. Dry heat was the preferred method for sterilization in 1992, but by 1999 it had been displaced by steam under pressure. Reported preference for more effective disinfectants was also evident overall. Conclusions: We found certain improvements in IC knowledge and practices between 1992 and 1999, and the results suggest targets for educational and regulatory efforts that are needed to promote better adherence to current IC standards.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-14
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Infection Control
Mexico
Dentists
HIV
Hepatitis B virus
Virus Diseases
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Dental Schools
Disinfectants
Steam
HIV Infections
Surveys and Questionnaires
Teaching
Hot Temperature
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Attitudes toward HIV-infected individuals and infection control practices among a group of dentists in mexico city - A 1999 update of the 1992 survey. / Maupome, Gerardo; Borges-Yáez, S. Aída; Díez-de-Bonilla, F. Javier; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2002, p. 8-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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