Augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

Andrew Goddard, Yong Wook Shin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth commonest mental disorder after depression, alcohol and substance misuse, and social phobia, with a mean lifetime prevalence of up to 3% in the general population (Karno et al. 1988). The OCD symptoms are time consuming and cause severe functional impairment, debilitating both to the patients and their family (Calvocoressi et al. 1995). The natural course of untreated OCD patients only leads to one fifth of the full remission rate (Skoog and Skoog 1999) and most untreated patients show a high rate of unemployment, less productivity, lower marriage rate, and many negative effects on their family members (Rasmussen and Eisen 1992; Leon et al. 1995; Koran et al. 1996). The current treatments of choice for OCD are behavioral therapy and serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRI). Clomipramine, a potent SRI and the later selective SRIs (SSRIs) will all be referred to here as SRIs in a broader sense. While SRIs such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline have been used for the treatment of OCD (Kelly and Myers 1990), approximately half of adult and pediatric OCD patients still do not respond to SRI therapy (Insel and Murphy 1981; Goodman and Price 1992; March et al. 1998; Liebowitz et al. 2002; March 2004). This has prompted searches for more effective pharmacological strategies for patients who fail to respond, or to respond adequately, to SRI treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationClinical Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders in Adults and Children
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages49-60
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9780511973796
ISBN (Print)9780521515696
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Goddard, A., & Shin, Y. W. (2011). Augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. In Clinical Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders in Adults and Children (pp. 49-60). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511973796.005