Autoantibody levels are associated with acute kidney injury, anemia and post-discharge morbidity and mortality in Ugandan children with severe malaria

Juan Rivera-Correa, Andrea L. Conroy, Robert O. Opoka, Anthony Batte, Ruth Namazzi, Benson Ouma, Paul Bangirana, Richard Idro, Andrew L. Schwaderer, Chandy C. John, Ana Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Autoantibodies targeting host antigens contribute to autoimmune disorders, frequently occur during and after infections and have been proposed to contribute to malaria-induced anemia. We measured anti-phosphatidylserine (PS) and anti-DNA antibody levels in 382 Ugandan children prospectively recruited in a study of severe malaria (SM). High antibody levels were defined as antibody levels greater than the mean plus 3 standard deviations of community children (CC). We observed increases in median levels of anti-PS and anti-DNA antibodies in children with SM compared to CC (p < 0.0001 for both). Children with severe malarial anemia were more likely to have high anti-PS antibodies than children with cerebral malaria (16.4% vs. 7.4%), p = 0.02. Increases in anti-PS and anti-DNA antibodies were associated with decreased hemoglobin (p < 0.05). A one-unit increase in anti-DNA antibodies was associated with a 2.99 (95% CI, 1.68, 5.31) increase odds of acute kidney injury (AKI) (p < 0.0001). Elevated anti-PS and anti-DNA antibodies were associated with post-discharge mortality (p = 0.031 and p = 0.042, respectively). Children with high anti-PS antibodies were more likely to have multiple hospital readmissions compared to children with normal anti-PS antibody levels (p < 0.05). SM is associated with increased autoantibodies against PS and DNA. Autoantibodies were associated with anemia, AKI, post-discharge mortality, and hospital readmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number14940
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Autoantibody levels are associated with acute kidney injury, anemia and post-discharge morbidity and mortality in Ugandan children with severe malaria'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Rivera-Correa, J., Conroy, A. L., Opoka, R. O., Batte, A., Namazzi, R., Ouma, B., Bangirana, P., Idro, R., Schwaderer, A. L., John, C. C., & Rodriguez, A. (2019). Autoantibody levels are associated with acute kidney injury, anemia and post-discharge morbidity and mortality in Ugandan children with severe malaria. Scientific reports, 9(1), [14940]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-51426-z