Autoantibody titers to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with coronary atherosclerosis

Minh N. Bui, Michael N. Sack, George Moutsatsos, David Y. Lu, Paul Katz, Rosemary McCown, Jeffrey Breall, Charles E. Rackley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is considered to be the initial step in the atherosclerotic process. Autoantibodies to oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) have been detected in human serum. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique to measure autoantibody titers in 63 normal subjects and patients with coronary artery disease. Thirty-five patients underwent coronary angiography for suspected coronary artery disease. Patients were divided into the following categories: group 1, 20 healthy young volunteers; group 2, 8 patients age-matched to the catheterization patients; group 3, 10 patients with normal coronary angiograms; and group 4, 25 patients with angiographic coronary artery disease. Autoantibody titers to ox-LDL were group 1, 0.142 ± 0.023; group 2, 0.197 ± 0.039; group 3, 0.183 ± 0.038; and group 4, 0.340 ± 0.026. There was no statistical difference among groups 1, 2, and 3, but the difference between these groups and group 4 was highly significant (p <0.05). This study demonstrates that (1) autoantibodies to ox-LDL can be detected in normal subjects and in patients with abnormal coronary angiograms and (2) significantly higher titers of autoantibodies to ox-LDL were seen in patients with angiographic evidence of coronary artery disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)663-667
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume131
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Autoantibodies
Coronary Artery Disease
Angiography
Immunosorbent Techniques
oxidized low density lipoprotein
Coronary Angiography
LDL Lipoproteins
Catheterization
Healthy Volunteers
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Bui, M. N., Sack, M. N., Moutsatsos, G., Lu, D. Y., Katz, P., McCown, R., ... Rackley, C. E. (1996). Autoantibody titers to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. American Heart Journal, 131(4), 663-667. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-8703(96)90268-9

Autoantibody titers to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. / Bui, Minh N.; Sack, Michael N.; Moutsatsos, George; Lu, David Y.; Katz, Paul; McCown, Rosemary; Breall, Jeffrey; Rackley, Charles E.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 131, No. 4, 1996, p. 663-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bui, MN, Sack, MN, Moutsatsos, G, Lu, DY, Katz, P, McCown, R, Breall, J & Rackley, CE 1996, 'Autoantibody titers to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with coronary atherosclerosis', American Heart Journal, vol. 131, no. 4, pp. 663-667. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-8703(96)90268-9
Bui, Minh N. ; Sack, Michael N. ; Moutsatsos, George ; Lu, David Y. ; Katz, Paul ; McCown, Rosemary ; Breall, Jeffrey ; Rackley, Charles E. / Autoantibody titers to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. In: American Heart Journal. 1996 ; Vol. 131, No. 4. pp. 663-667.
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