Bacterial Infections of the Central Nervous System

Paul A. Lapenna, Karen Roos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Acute bacterial meningitis and spinal epidural abscess are neurological emergencies. Acute bacterial meningitis may present with symptoms as nonspecific as headache and fever, but rapid progression to an altered level of consciousness is not unusual. Spinal epidural abscess manifests initially as back pain, followed by radicular pain, then weakness, and finally paraplegia. Brain abscess may initially present only with headache, or as a new-onset seizure or with a focal neurological deficit. Bacterial infections of the central nervous system require emergent diagnosis and management. In this article, the pathogenesis, etiological organisms, diagnostic studies, differential diagnosis and management of acute bacterial meningitis, spinal epidural abscess, and brain abscess are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-342
Number of pages9
JournalSeminars in Neurology
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Central Nervous System Bacterial Infections
Epidural Abscess
Bacterial Meningitides
Brain Abscess
Headache
Consciousness Disorders
Paraplegia
Back Pain
Seizures
Emergencies
Differential Diagnosis
Fever
Pain

Keywords

  • acute bacterial meningitis
  • brain abscess
  • spinal epidural abscess

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Bacterial Infections of the Central Nervous System. / Lapenna, Paul A.; Roos, Karen.

In: Seminars in Neurology, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.01.2019, p. 334-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lapenna, Paul A. ; Roos, Karen. / Bacterial Infections of the Central Nervous System. In: Seminars in Neurology. 2019 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 334-342.
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