Barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients

Catherine E. Mosher, Joseph G. Winger, Nasser Hanna, Shadia Jalal, Achilles J. Fakiris, Lawrence Einhorn, Thomas Birdas, Kenneth Kesler, Victoria Champion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective This study examined barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients (N = 165) at two medical centers in the Midwestern United States. Methods Lung cancer patients completed an assessment of anxiety and depressive symptoms, mental health service use, barriers to using these services, and preferences for addressing emotional concerns. Results Only 45% of distressed patients received mental health care since their lung cancer diagnosis. The most prevalent patient-reported barriers to mental health service use among non-users of these services (n = 110) included the desire to independently manage emotional concerns (58%) and inadequate knowledge of services (19%). In addition, 57% of distressed patients who did not access mental health services did not perceive the need for help. Seventy-five percent of respondents (123/164) preferred to talk to a primary care physician if they were to have an emotional concern. Preferences for counseling, psychiatric medication, peer support, spiritual care, or independently managing emotional concerns also were endorsed by many patients (range = 40-50%). Older age was associated with a lower likelihood of preferring to see a counselor. Conclusions Findings suggest that many distressed lung cancer patients underuse mental health services and do not perceive the need for such services. Efforts to increase appropriate use of services should address patients' desire for autonomy and lack of awareness of services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)812-819
Number of pages8
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Mental Health Services
Lung Neoplasms
Midwestern United States
Primary Care Physicians
Psychiatry
Counseling
Mental Health
Anxiety
Depression
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • barriers
  • distress
  • lung cancer
  • mental health service use
  • oncology
  • psychological

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients. / Mosher, Catherine E.; Winger, Joseph G.; Hanna, Nasser; Jalal, Shadia; Fakiris, Achilles J.; Einhorn, Lawrence; Birdas, Thomas; Kesler, Kenneth; Champion, Victoria.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 23, No. 7, 2014, p. 812-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{32722f946d954cf281f905c5ae803423,
title = "Barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients",
abstract = "Objective This study examined barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients (N = 165) at two medical centers in the Midwestern United States. Methods Lung cancer patients completed an assessment of anxiety and depressive symptoms, mental health service use, barriers to using these services, and preferences for addressing emotional concerns. Results Only 45{\%} of distressed patients received mental health care since their lung cancer diagnosis. The most prevalent patient-reported barriers to mental health service use among non-users of these services (n = 110) included the desire to independently manage emotional concerns (58{\%}) and inadequate knowledge of services (19{\%}). In addition, 57{\%} of distressed patients who did not access mental health services did not perceive the need for help. Seventy-five percent of respondents (123/164) preferred to talk to a primary care physician if they were to have an emotional concern. Preferences for counseling, psychiatric medication, peer support, spiritual care, or independently managing emotional concerns also were endorsed by many patients (range = 40-50{\%}). Older age was associated with a lower likelihood of preferring to see a counselor. Conclusions Findings suggest that many distressed lung cancer patients underuse mental health services and do not perceive the need for such services. Efforts to increase appropriate use of services should address patients' desire for autonomy and lack of awareness of services.",
keywords = "barriers, distress, lung cancer, mental health service use, oncology, psychological",
author = "Mosher, {Catherine E.} and Winger, {Joseph G.} and Nasser Hanna and Shadia Jalal and Fakiris, {Achilles J.} and Lawrence Einhorn and Thomas Birdas and Kenneth Kesler and Victoria Champion",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1002/pon.3488",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "812--819",
journal = "Psycho-Oncology",
issn = "1057-9249",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients

AU - Mosher, Catherine E.

AU - Winger, Joseph G.

AU - Hanna, Nasser

AU - Jalal, Shadia

AU - Fakiris, Achilles J.

AU - Einhorn, Lawrence

AU - Birdas, Thomas

AU - Kesler, Kenneth

AU - Champion, Victoria

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective This study examined barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients (N = 165) at two medical centers in the Midwestern United States. Methods Lung cancer patients completed an assessment of anxiety and depressive symptoms, mental health service use, barriers to using these services, and preferences for addressing emotional concerns. Results Only 45% of distressed patients received mental health care since their lung cancer diagnosis. The most prevalent patient-reported barriers to mental health service use among non-users of these services (n = 110) included the desire to independently manage emotional concerns (58%) and inadequate knowledge of services (19%). In addition, 57% of distressed patients who did not access mental health services did not perceive the need for help. Seventy-five percent of respondents (123/164) preferred to talk to a primary care physician if they were to have an emotional concern. Preferences for counseling, psychiatric medication, peer support, spiritual care, or independently managing emotional concerns also were endorsed by many patients (range = 40-50%). Older age was associated with a lower likelihood of preferring to see a counselor. Conclusions Findings suggest that many distressed lung cancer patients underuse mental health services and do not perceive the need for such services. Efforts to increase appropriate use of services should address patients' desire for autonomy and lack of awareness of services.

AB - Objective This study examined barriers to mental health service use and preferences for addressing emotional concerns among lung cancer patients (N = 165) at two medical centers in the Midwestern United States. Methods Lung cancer patients completed an assessment of anxiety and depressive symptoms, mental health service use, barriers to using these services, and preferences for addressing emotional concerns. Results Only 45% of distressed patients received mental health care since their lung cancer diagnosis. The most prevalent patient-reported barriers to mental health service use among non-users of these services (n = 110) included the desire to independently manage emotional concerns (58%) and inadequate knowledge of services (19%). In addition, 57% of distressed patients who did not access mental health services did not perceive the need for help. Seventy-five percent of respondents (123/164) preferred to talk to a primary care physician if they were to have an emotional concern. Preferences for counseling, psychiatric medication, peer support, spiritual care, or independently managing emotional concerns also were endorsed by many patients (range = 40-50%). Older age was associated with a lower likelihood of preferring to see a counselor. Conclusions Findings suggest that many distressed lung cancer patients underuse mental health services and do not perceive the need for such services. Efforts to increase appropriate use of services should address patients' desire for autonomy and lack of awareness of services.

KW - barriers

KW - distress

KW - lung cancer

KW - mental health service use

KW - oncology

KW - psychological

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903820395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84903820395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pon.3488

DO - 10.1002/pon.3488

M3 - Article

C2 - 24493634

AN - SCOPUS:84903820395

VL - 23

SP - 812

EP - 819

JO - Psycho-Oncology

JF - Psycho-Oncology

SN - 1057-9249

IS - 7

ER -