BARRIERS TO UPTAKE OF BREAST CANCER SCREENING IN KENYA

J. Wachira, A. F. Chite, V. Naanyu, N. Busakhala, J. Kisuya, A. Keter, A. Mwangi, Thomas Inui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To conduct clinical breast cancer screening in three sites in Western Kenya and explore community barriers to screening uptake.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

SETTING: Western Kenya specifically, Mosoriot, Turbo, and Kapsokwony.

SUBJECTS: Community members (18 years and older) who did not attend the screening events.

OUTCOME MEASURE: The outcome measure was having heard about the breast cancer screening events. Both structured and open-ended questions were used for data collection. Item frequency, correlations, and content analyses were performed.

RESULTS: A total of 733 community members were surveyed (63% women, median age 33 years, IQR = 26-43). More than half (55%) of respondents had heard about the screening but did not attend. The majority of those who had heard about this particular screening had knowledge of screening availability in general (45% vs. 25%, p < 0.001). Only 8.0% of those who heard and 6.0% of those who had not heard of the screening event had previously undergone clinical breast exam (p = 0.20). Reasons for not attending the screening event were personal factors, including busy schedule (41.0%), perceived low personal risk (12.7%), lack of transport (4.2%), as well as health facility factors such as poor publicity (14.4%) and long queues (8.7%).

CONCLUSION: Barriers to breast cancer screening uptake were associated with inadequate publicity, perceived long waits at event and busy lives among community women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-397
Number of pages7
JournalEast African Medical Journal
Volume91
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Kenya
Early Detection of Cancer
Breast Neoplasms
Health Facilities
Appointments and Schedules
Breast
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wachira, J., Chite, A. F., Naanyu, V., Busakhala, N., Kisuya, J., Keter, A., ... Inui, T. (2014). BARRIERS TO UPTAKE OF BREAST CANCER SCREENING IN KENYA. East African Medical Journal, 91(11), 391-397.

BARRIERS TO UPTAKE OF BREAST CANCER SCREENING IN KENYA. / Wachira, J.; Chite, A. F.; Naanyu, V.; Busakhala, N.; Kisuya, J.; Keter, A.; Mwangi, A.; Inui, Thomas.

In: East African Medical Journal, Vol. 91, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 391-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wachira, J, Chite, AF, Naanyu, V, Busakhala, N, Kisuya, J, Keter, A, Mwangi, A & Inui, T 2014, 'BARRIERS TO UPTAKE OF BREAST CANCER SCREENING IN KENYA', East African Medical Journal, vol. 91, no. 11, pp. 391-397.
Wachira J, Chite AF, Naanyu V, Busakhala N, Kisuya J, Keter A et al. BARRIERS TO UPTAKE OF BREAST CANCER SCREENING IN KENYA. East African Medical Journal. 2014 Nov 1;91(11):391-397.
Wachira, J. ; Chite, A. F. ; Naanyu, V. ; Busakhala, N. ; Kisuya, J. ; Keter, A. ; Mwangi, A. ; Inui, Thomas. / BARRIERS TO UPTAKE OF BREAST CANCER SCREENING IN KENYA. In: East African Medical Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 91, No. 11. pp. 391-397.
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