Behavior and mental health problems in children with epilepsy and low IQ

Janice Buelow, Joan K. Austin, Susan Perkins, Jianzhao Shen, David Dunn, Philip S. Fastenau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this cross-sectional descriptive study was to describe the particular types of behavioral problems, self-concept, and symptoms of depression experienced by children with both low IQ and epilepsy. Three groups of children (83 males, 81 females; mean age 11 years 10 months, SD 1 year 10 months; age range 9 to 14 years) with epilepsy were compared: (Group 1) Low IQ (<85), n=48, 25 males, 23 females; (Group 2) Middle IQ (85 to 100), n=58, 24 males, 34 females; and (Group 3) High IQ (>100), n=58, 34 males, 24 females. The Child Behavior Checklist, Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale, and Children's Depression Inventory were used to measure behavior, self-concept, and depression respectively. Results indicated that children in the Low IQ group had the most behavioral and mental health problems. Additionally, there were IQ group-by-sex interactions, with females in the Low IQ group being at the highest risk for poor self-concept. Findings suggest that children with both epilepsy and low IQ should be carefully assessed for mental health problems in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)683-692
Number of pages10
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume45
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

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Epilepsy
Mental Health
Self Concept
Depression
Child Behavior
Checklist
Cross-Sectional Studies
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Behavior and mental health problems in children with epilepsy and low IQ. / Buelow, Janice; Austin, Joan K.; Perkins, Susan; Shen, Jianzhao; Dunn, David; Fastenau, Philip S.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 45, No. 10, 01.10.2003, p. 683-692.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buelow, Janice ; Austin, Joan K. ; Perkins, Susan ; Shen, Jianzhao ; Dunn, David ; Fastenau, Philip S. / Behavior and mental health problems in children with epilepsy and low IQ. In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. 2003 ; Vol. 45, No. 10. pp. 683-692.
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