Behavioral and Biochemical Correlates of Alcohol Drinking Preference: Studies on the Selectively Bred P and NP Rats

Lawrence Lumeng, James M. Murphy, William J. McBride, Ting‐Kai ‐K Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract: The alcohol‐preferring P and alcohol‐nonpreferring NP lines of rates have been selectively bred and used to study the behavioral and biochemical correlates of alcohol‐seeking behavior. The P rats satisfy all the perceived criteria for an animal model of alcoholism. Specifically, free‐fed P rats voluntarily drink alcoholic solutions (10 to 30% v/v) to intoxication; they bar‐press to obtain alcohol and self‐administer ethanol intragastrically when food and water are available; and they acquire metabolic and neuronal tolerance and develop physical dependence when they drink alcohol chronically in a free‐choice situation. The spontaneous motor activity in the P rats, but not in the NP rats, is stimulated acutely by low doses of alcohol. With a single hypnotic dose of ethanol, acute tolerance develops faster and to a greater degree and persists many days longer in the P than in the NP rats. These differences in response to ethanol may explain the disparate alcohol drinking behaviors of the P and NP rats. Biochemically, the P rats exhibit decreased serotonin levels in several brain regions including the nucleus accumbens. Serotonin uptake inhibitors curtail the alcohol drinking of the P rats suggesting a role of serotonin in mediating alcohol preference. 1988 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-20
Number of pages4
JournalDrug and Alcohol Review
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

Fingerprint

Alcohol Drinking
alcohol
Alcohols
Ethanol
alcoholism
tolerance
Serotonin
intoxication
Drinking Behavior
Nucleus Accumbens
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Hypnotics and Sedatives
brain
Alcoholism
animal
Motor Activity
food
Animal Models
drug
water

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • Alcohol drinking
  • alcoholism
  • animal
  • disease models
  • ethyl
  • rats
  • serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Behavioral and Biochemical Correlates of Alcohol Drinking Preference : Studies on the Selectively Bred P and NP Rats. / Lumeng, Lawrence; Murphy, James M.; McBride, William J.; Li, Ting‐Kai ‐K.

In: Drug and Alcohol Review, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1988, p. 17-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lumeng, Lawrence ; Murphy, James M. ; McBride, William J. ; Li, Ting‐Kai ‐K. / Behavioral and Biochemical Correlates of Alcohol Drinking Preference : Studies on the Selectively Bred P and NP Rats. In: Drug and Alcohol Review. 1988 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 17-20.
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