Behavioral health care needs, detention-based care, and criminal recidivism at community reentry from Juvenile detention: A multisite survival curve analysis

Matthew Aalsma, Laura M. White, Katherine S L Lau, Anthony Perkins, Patrick Monahan, Thomas Grisso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the provision of behavioral health services to youths detained in Indiana between 2008 and 2012 and the impact of services on recidivism. Method. We obtained information about behavioral health needs, behavioral health treatment received, and recidivism within 12 months after release for 8363 adolescents (aged 12-18 years; 79.4% male). We conducted survival analyses to determine whether behavioral health services significantly affected time to recidivating. Results. Approximately 19.1% of youths had positive mental health screens, and 25.3% of all youths recidivated within 12 months after release. Of youths with positive screens, 29.2% saw a mental health clinician, 16.1% received behavioral health services during detention, and 30.0% received referrals for postdetention services. Survival analyses showed that being male, Black, and younger, and having higher scores on the substance use or irritability subscales of the screen predicted shorter time to recidivism. Receiving a behavior precaution, behavioral health services in detention, or an assessment in the community also predicted shorter time to recidivating. Conclusions. Findings support previous research showing that behavioral health problems are related to recidivism and that Black males are disproportionately rearrested after detention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1372-1378
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume105
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Survival Analysis
Health Services
Delivery of Health Care
Mental Health
Health
Referral and Consultation
Research
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Behavioral health care needs, detention-based care, and criminal recidivism at community reentry from Juvenile detention : A multisite survival curve analysis. / Aalsma, Matthew; White, Laura M.; Lau, Katherine S L; Perkins, Anthony; Monahan, Patrick; Grisso, Thomas.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 105, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 1372-1378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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