“behavioral imaging”—III. Interexpert agreement and reliability of weightings

Ruben C. Gur, Andrew Saykin, Arthur Benton, Edith Kaplan, Harvey Levin, D. Brian Kester, Raquel E. Gur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The first article of this series presented an algorithm for topographic display and analysis of neuropsychological test scores. The second article provided initial validation of the method for quantitative hypothesis testing on regional brain function in hemiparkinsonism. This article further examines the algorithm's potential contribution in the systematic joining of neuropsychological test scores with theoretical weightings of the sensitivity of each test score to lesions in specific regions of interest (ROIs). We obtained theoretical weightings from four expert neuropsychologists and examined interexpert agreement and intraexpert reliability. The experts suggested revision of the ROI placement to reflect regions of particular neuropsychological importance, provided weights for these ROIs, and identified a consensus test battery (as a minimum core) necessary for valid application of the algorithm. There was good interexpert agreement, with significant correlations for all pairs of experts. Intraexpert reliability was determined by obtaining a second set of ratings from the four experts approximately 1 year later. Intraexpert reliability was high and significant for all experts. We conclude that topographic weighting of neuropsychological test performance is feasible in that it can be done reliably, and with good agreement among expert raters. Thus it appears to meet standards for research applications in neuropsychology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-124
Number of pages12
JournalNeuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology
Volume3
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuropsychological Tests
Neuropsychology
Consensus
Weights and Measures
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • Behavioral imaging
  • Brain topography
  • Expert systems
  • Neuroimaging
  • Neuropsychological test
  • Reliability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Gur, R. C., Saykin, A., Benton, A., Kaplan, E., Levin, H., Kester, D. B., & Gur, R. E. (1990). “behavioral imaging”—III. Interexpert agreement and reliability of weightings. Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology, 3(2), 113-124.

“behavioral imaging”—III. Interexpert agreement and reliability of weightings. / Gur, Ruben C.; Saykin, Andrew; Benton, Arthur; Kaplan, Edith; Levin, Harvey; Kester, D. Brian; Gur, Raquel E.

In: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology, Vol. 3, No. 2, 1990, p. 113-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gur, RC, Saykin, A, Benton, A, Kaplan, E, Levin, H, Kester, DB & Gur, RE 1990, '“behavioral imaging”—III. Interexpert agreement and reliability of weightings', Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 113-124.
Gur, Ruben C. ; Saykin, Andrew ; Benton, Arthur ; Kaplan, Edith ; Levin, Harvey ; Kester, D. Brian ; Gur, Raquel E. / “behavioral imaging”—III. Interexpert agreement and reliability of weightings. In: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology. 1990 ; Vol. 3, No. 2. pp. 113-124.
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