Behavioural adjustment and parental stress associated with closed head injury in children

Deborah Sokol, C. F. Ferguson, G. A. Pitcher, G. A. Huster, K. Fitzhugh-Bell, T. G. Luerssen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parental stress and parental perception of children's behavioural problems were determined for 25 caretakers of children with closed head injury. Compared to normative samples a greater proportion of parents in this study were more stressed, and thought that their children were more behaviourally impaired. In contrast to previous studies, injury severity was not related to behavioural impairment. Parental stress was related to perceived behavioural impairment for the brain-injured sample. When compared to low-stressed parents (n = 14), high-stressed parents (n = 11) described their children as more aggressive and with more thought disorders and attention problems. Time since injury, age at injury, number of siblings, and mother's age were not different between the high- and low-stressed groups. Low income and less education were associated with the high stress levels in these parents. Test-retest data showed that, over time, parents perceived their brain-injured children as less behaviourally impaired.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-451
Number of pages13
JournalBrain Injury
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1996

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Closed Head Injuries
Social Adjustment
Parents
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Siblings
Mothers
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Sokol, D., Ferguson, C. F., Pitcher, G. A., Huster, G. A., Fitzhugh-Bell, K., & Luerssen, T. G. (1996). Behavioural adjustment and parental stress associated with closed head injury in children. Brain Injury, 10(6), 439-451. https://doi.org/10.1080/026990596124296

Behavioural adjustment and parental stress associated with closed head injury in children. / Sokol, Deborah; Ferguson, C. F.; Pitcher, G. A.; Huster, G. A.; Fitzhugh-Bell, K.; Luerssen, T. G.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 10, No. 6, 06.1996, p. 439-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sokol, D, Ferguson, CF, Pitcher, GA, Huster, GA, Fitzhugh-Bell, K & Luerssen, TG 1996, 'Behavioural adjustment and parental stress associated with closed head injury in children', Brain Injury, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 439-451. https://doi.org/10.1080/026990596124296
Sokol, Deborah ; Ferguson, C. F. ; Pitcher, G. A. ; Huster, G. A. ; Fitzhugh-Bell, K. ; Luerssen, T. G. / Behavioural adjustment and parental stress associated with closed head injury in children. In: Brain Injury. 1996 ; Vol. 10, No. 6. pp. 439-451.
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