Beta blockers and the primary prevention of nonfatal myocardial infarction in patients with high blood pressure

Bruce M. Psaty, Thomas D. Koepsell, Edward H. Wagner, James P. LoGerfo, Thomas Inui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A population-based, case-control study was conducted to determine whether β blockers, used for the treatment of high blood pressure, prevent first events of coronary heart disease. All study subjects were health-maintenance organization enrollees with pharmacologically treated hypertension. Patients presented in 1982 to 1984 with new coronary heart disease, and control subjects were a probability sample of eligible hypertensive enrollees free of coronary heart disease. With the investigators blind to case-control status, the subjects' medical records were reviewed for other coronary risk factors, and the health-maintenance organization's computerized pharmacy database was used to ascertain the use of β blockers. A larger proportion of controls than cases were using β blockers. This difference was confined to the subgroup with nonfatal myocardial infarctions. For current use, the estimated relative risk for nonfatal myocardial infarction was 0.62 (95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.99). Among current users of β blockers, higher doses conferred greater protection. Past use and total lifetime intake of β blockers were only weakly associated with case-control status. The current use of β blockers may prevent first events of nonfatal myocardial infarction in patients with high blood pressure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume66
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 6 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Prevention
Coronary Disease
Health Maintenance Organizations
Myocardial Infarction
Hypertension
Sampling Studies
Medical Records
Case-Control Studies
Research Personnel
Databases
Confidence Intervals
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Beta blockers and the primary prevention of nonfatal myocardial infarction in patients with high blood pressure. / Psaty, Bruce M.; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Wagner, Edward H.; LoGerfo, James P.; Inui, Thomas.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 66, No. 16, 06.11.1990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Psaty, Bruce M. ; Koepsell, Thomas D. ; Wagner, Edward H. ; LoGerfo, James P. ; Inui, Thomas. / Beta blockers and the primary prevention of nonfatal myocardial infarction in patients with high blood pressure. In: The American Journal of Cardiology. 1990 ; Vol. 66, No. 16.
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