Bilateral testicular tumors: Management and outcome in 21 patients

Christopher L. Coogan, Richard Foster, Garrick R. Simmons, Piero G. Tognoni, Bruce J. Roth, John P. Donohue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND. The authors examined the clinical course of patients with bilateral testicular tumors to determine whether the outcome after treatment was different from patients with unilateral tumors. METHODS. Using a computerized data base of 2088 patients with testicular carcinoma at Indiana University, 21 patients (1%) were identified with bilateral testicular carcinoma. A retrospective review of hospital and clinic charts was performed. Sixteen patients with metachronous and 5 patients with synchronous testicular tumors were identified. RESULTS. Treatment was based on clinical stage and was similar to therapy given for unilateral disease. The mean age at presentation of the first testicular tumor was 28.4 years (range, 16-47 years). Approximately 50% of the second primary tumors presented > 5 years after the contralateral tumor. At a mean follow-up of 49.9 months (range, 1- 276 months), 18 patients were without evidence of disease, 2 were alive with disease, and 1 patient had died of disease. CONCLUSIONS. The treatment of patients with bilateral germ cell tumors is based on the pathology and clinical stage and should not be different from the traditional management of unilateral testicular carcinoma. Patients with unilateral testicular carcinoma should be informed of the necessity of long term follow-up because contralateral testicular carcinoma may occur as long as 25 years later.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)547-552
Number of pages6
JournalCancer
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1998

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Testicular Neoplasms
Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Clinical Pathology
Germ Cell and Embryonal Neoplasms
Therapeutics
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Keywords

  • Bilateral
  • Synchronous
  • Testicular carcinoma metachronous

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Bilateral testicular tumors : Management and outcome in 21 patients. / Coogan, Christopher L.; Foster, Richard; Simmons, Garrick R.; Tognoni, Piero G.; Roth, Bruce J.; Donohue, John P.

In: Cancer, Vol. 83, No. 3, 01.08.1998, p. 547-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coogan, Christopher L. ; Foster, Richard ; Simmons, Garrick R. ; Tognoni, Piero G. ; Roth, Bruce J. ; Donohue, John P. / Bilateral testicular tumors : Management and outcome in 21 patients. In: Cancer. 1998 ; Vol. 83, No. 3. pp. 547-552.
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