Biodegradation of a dental resin material by fibroblast conditioned media

Karen S. Gregson, L. Windsor, Jeffrey Platt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Hydrolytic activity is increased in conditioned media from human gingival and pulp fibroblasts in response to exposure to triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). The purpose of this study was to determine if this conditioned media with hydrolytic activity could cause the biodegradation of a dental resin material. Methods: Resin material specimens were stored for 30 days at 37 °C in distilled water, unconditioned media, artificial serum, conditioned media from human gingival and pulp fibroblasts and conditioned media from human pulp and gingival fibroblasts that were exposed to TEGDMA. The media was exchanged every other day. The specimens were subjected to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) before and after storage. The area under the carbonyl peak was calculated for all the specimens to determine the extent of the degradation. Results: Differences before and after storage in the area under the carbonyl peak were statistically significant for the specimens stored in the conditioned media from the fibroblasts that were exposed to TEGDMA. All of the other specimens did not produce differences in the area under the carbonyl peak that were statistically significant when comparing the before and after storage results. Significance: The biodegradation demonstrated here could contribute to the marginal leaking seen clinically with the use of resin materials in dental restorations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1358-1362
Number of pages5
JournalDental Materials
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Synthetic Resins
Dental Materials
Fibroblasts
Conditioned Culture Medium
Biodegradation
Resins
Pulp
Restoration
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Degradation
Water
Serum
triethylene glycol dimethacrylate

Keywords

  • Biodegradation
  • Dental materials
  • Human gingival fibroblasts
  • Human pulp fibroblasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Biodegradation of a dental resin material by fibroblast conditioned media. / Gregson, Karen S.; Windsor, L.; Platt, Jeffrey.

In: Dental Materials, Vol. 25, No. 11, 11.2009, p. 1358-1362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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