Blood bank management of sickle cell patients at comprehensive sickle cell centers

Araba Afenyi-Annan, Monte Willis, Thomas R. Konrad, Richard Lottenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Transfusion therapy has been integral to decreasing morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD). Several studies however, have demonstrated variation in the blood bank (BB) practices for these patients. The purpose of this study was to examine BB practices for SCD patients at NIH Comprehensive Sickle Cell Centers (CSCCs) and to determine whether consensus in BB management exists. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of BB medical directors and laboratory supervisors at CSCCs was conducted between October 2004 and March 2005. The survey assessed respondent, hospital, and BB characteristics; pretransfusion procedures; blood product selection; and agreement with statements about consensus in management. Physician respondents were also asked to select their preferred management strategy in four hypothetical transfusion-related cases. RESULTS: Responses were received from 36 of 49 (73.5%) institutions. Pretransfusion procedures and blood product selection were nearly uniform among CSCCs. Of the respondents, 69 percent disagreed with the statement that clear consensus exists on the use of phenotypically matched red blood cells for SCD patients; 55 percent disagreed that clear consensus exists on the use of chronic transfusion programs for SCD patients. Although there was consensus on the use of transfusion therapy for life- or organ-threatening situations, optimal management of preoperative transfusion therapy and severe delayed transfusion reactions appears controversial. CONCLUSION: This study provides the first overview of BB management of patients with SCD at CSCCs and identifies areas where there is perceived and actual lack of consensus. These results suggest that opportunities remain to standardize transfusion practices for SCD patients across all hospital settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2089-2097
Number of pages9
JournalTransfusion
Volume47
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood Banks
Sickle Cell Anemia
Physician Executives
Therapeutics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Erythrocytes
Morbidity
Physicians
Mortality
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Blood bank management of sickle cell patients at comprehensive sickle cell centers. / Afenyi-Annan, Araba; Willis, Monte; Konrad, Thomas R.; Lottenberg, Richard.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 47, No. 11, 01.11.2007, p. 2089-2097.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Afenyi-Annan, Araba ; Willis, Monte ; Konrad, Thomas R. ; Lottenberg, Richard. / Blood bank management of sickle cell patients at comprehensive sickle cell centers. In: Transfusion. 2007 ; Vol. 47, No. 11. pp. 2089-2097.
@article{199c42b4f1d44b4e87f593ac97410d6e,
title = "Blood bank management of sickle cell patients at comprehensive sickle cell centers",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Transfusion therapy has been integral to decreasing morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD). Several studies however, have demonstrated variation in the blood bank (BB) practices for these patients. The purpose of this study was to examine BB practices for SCD patients at NIH Comprehensive Sickle Cell Centers (CSCCs) and to determine whether consensus in BB management exists. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of BB medical directors and laboratory supervisors at CSCCs was conducted between October 2004 and March 2005. The survey assessed respondent, hospital, and BB characteristics; pretransfusion procedures; blood product selection; and agreement with statements about consensus in management. Physician respondents were also asked to select their preferred management strategy in four hypothetical transfusion-related cases. RESULTS: Responses were received from 36 of 49 (73.5{\%}) institutions. Pretransfusion procedures and blood product selection were nearly uniform among CSCCs. Of the respondents, 69 percent disagreed with the statement that clear consensus exists on the use of phenotypically matched red blood cells for SCD patients; 55 percent disagreed that clear consensus exists on the use of chronic transfusion programs for SCD patients. Although there was consensus on the use of transfusion therapy for life- or organ-threatening situations, optimal management of preoperative transfusion therapy and severe delayed transfusion reactions appears controversial. CONCLUSION: This study provides the first overview of BB management of patients with SCD at CSCCs and identifies areas where there is perceived and actual lack of consensus. These results suggest that opportunities remain to standardize transfusion practices for SCD patients across all hospital settings.",
author = "Araba Afenyi-Annan and Monte Willis and Konrad, {Thomas R.} and Richard Lottenberg",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1537-2995.2007.01434.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "2089--2097",
journal = "Transfusion",
issn = "0041-1132",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Blood bank management of sickle cell patients at comprehensive sickle cell centers

AU - Afenyi-Annan, Araba

AU - Willis, Monte

AU - Konrad, Thomas R.

AU - Lottenberg, Richard

PY - 2007/11/1

Y1 - 2007/11/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Transfusion therapy has been integral to decreasing morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD). Several studies however, have demonstrated variation in the blood bank (BB) practices for these patients. The purpose of this study was to examine BB practices for SCD patients at NIH Comprehensive Sickle Cell Centers (CSCCs) and to determine whether consensus in BB management exists. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of BB medical directors and laboratory supervisors at CSCCs was conducted between October 2004 and March 2005. The survey assessed respondent, hospital, and BB characteristics; pretransfusion procedures; blood product selection; and agreement with statements about consensus in management. Physician respondents were also asked to select their preferred management strategy in four hypothetical transfusion-related cases. RESULTS: Responses were received from 36 of 49 (73.5%) institutions. Pretransfusion procedures and blood product selection were nearly uniform among CSCCs. Of the respondents, 69 percent disagreed with the statement that clear consensus exists on the use of phenotypically matched red blood cells for SCD patients; 55 percent disagreed that clear consensus exists on the use of chronic transfusion programs for SCD patients. Although there was consensus on the use of transfusion therapy for life- or organ-threatening situations, optimal management of preoperative transfusion therapy and severe delayed transfusion reactions appears controversial. CONCLUSION: This study provides the first overview of BB management of patients with SCD at CSCCs and identifies areas where there is perceived and actual lack of consensus. These results suggest that opportunities remain to standardize transfusion practices for SCD patients across all hospital settings.

AB - BACKGROUND: Transfusion therapy has been integral to decreasing morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD). Several studies however, have demonstrated variation in the blood bank (BB) practices for these patients. The purpose of this study was to examine BB practices for SCD patients at NIH Comprehensive Sickle Cell Centers (CSCCs) and to determine whether consensus in BB management exists. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of BB medical directors and laboratory supervisors at CSCCs was conducted between October 2004 and March 2005. The survey assessed respondent, hospital, and BB characteristics; pretransfusion procedures; blood product selection; and agreement with statements about consensus in management. Physician respondents were also asked to select their preferred management strategy in four hypothetical transfusion-related cases. RESULTS: Responses were received from 36 of 49 (73.5%) institutions. Pretransfusion procedures and blood product selection were nearly uniform among CSCCs. Of the respondents, 69 percent disagreed with the statement that clear consensus exists on the use of phenotypically matched red blood cells for SCD patients; 55 percent disagreed that clear consensus exists on the use of chronic transfusion programs for SCD patients. Although there was consensus on the use of transfusion therapy for life- or organ-threatening situations, optimal management of preoperative transfusion therapy and severe delayed transfusion reactions appears controversial. CONCLUSION: This study provides the first overview of BB management of patients with SCD at CSCCs and identifies areas where there is perceived and actual lack of consensus. These results suggest that opportunities remain to standardize transfusion practices for SCD patients across all hospital settings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35448960846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35448960846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2007.01434.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2007.01434.x

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 2089

EP - 2097

JO - Transfusion

JF - Transfusion

SN - 0041-1132

IS - 11

ER -