Blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and body mass index in glaucoma patients

Sandra Ngo, Alon Harris, Brent Siesky, Anne Schroeder, George Eckert, Stephen Holland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate relationships between blood pressure (BP), ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), and intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) of different body mass index (BMI) classes. Methods: Data from participants of a prospective, longitudinal, single site, observational study were analyzed. Patients with a prior diagnosis of OAG completed 2 baseline visits (1 week apart) with follow-up visits every 6 months for 2 years. At each visit, BP, weight, height, and IOP were recorded for normal-weight (BMI 18.5-24.9; n = 38), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9; n = 43), and obese (BMI ≥30; n = 34) patients: The BP was measured using automated ambulatory measurements after 5 minutes rest and IOP was measured using Goldmann applanation tonometry. Results: The IOP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in normal-weight (-1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.7 to -0.4), overweight (-1.9, 95% CI -3.4 to -0.4), and obese (-2.5, 95% CI -3.9 to -1.2) patients with OAG. Systolic BP (SBP) and OPP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in all 3 BMI categories, although not reaching statistical significance. In normal-weight patients, there was a significant, positive correlation between changes in IOP and SBP (r = 0.36, p = 0.0431). A significant, negative correlation was observed between changes in IOP and OPP in overweight (r = -0.56, p = 0.0002) and obese (r = -0.38, p = 0.0499) patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that in normal-weight individuals with OAG, changes in SBP were positively correlated to changes in IOP. However, this relationship did not exist for overweight or obese patients. Instead, overweight and obese patients displayed a negative correlation between OPP and IOP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)664-669
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Intraocular Pressure
Glaucoma
Body Mass Index
Perfusion
Blood Pressure
Pressure
Open Angle Glaucoma
Weights and Measures
Confidence Intervals
Manometry
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Body mass index
  • Glaucoma
  • Intraocular pressure
  • Ocular perfusion pressure
  • Open-angle glaucoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and body mass index in glaucoma patients. / Ngo, Sandra; Harris, Alon; Siesky, Brent; Schroeder, Anne; Eckert, George; Holland, Stephen.

In: European Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 23, No. 5, 2013, p. 664-669.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ngo, Sandra ; Harris, Alon ; Siesky, Brent ; Schroeder, Anne ; Eckert, George ; Holland, Stephen. / Blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and body mass index in glaucoma patients. In: European Journal of Ophthalmology. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 664-669.
@article{9c73a3c0846c49038dc178624c6f39e0,
title = "Blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and body mass index in glaucoma patients",
abstract = "Purpose: To investigate relationships between blood pressure (BP), ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), and intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) of different body mass index (BMI) classes. Methods: Data from participants of a prospective, longitudinal, single site, observational study were analyzed. Patients with a prior diagnosis of OAG completed 2 baseline visits (1 week apart) with follow-up visits every 6 months for 2 years. At each visit, BP, weight, height, and IOP were recorded for normal-weight (BMI 18.5-24.9; n = 38), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9; n = 43), and obese (BMI ≥30; n = 34) patients: The BP was measured using automated ambulatory measurements after 5 minutes rest and IOP was measured using Goldmann applanation tonometry. Results: The IOP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in normal-weight (-1.5, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] -2.7 to -0.4), overweight (-1.9, 95{\%} CI -3.4 to -0.4), and obese (-2.5, 95{\%} CI -3.9 to -1.2) patients with OAG. Systolic BP (SBP) and OPP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in all 3 BMI categories, although not reaching statistical significance. In normal-weight patients, there was a significant, positive correlation between changes in IOP and SBP (r = 0.36, p = 0.0431). A significant, negative correlation was observed between changes in IOP and OPP in overweight (r = -0.56, p = 0.0002) and obese (r = -0.38, p = 0.0499) patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that in normal-weight individuals with OAG, changes in SBP were positively correlated to changes in IOP. However, this relationship did not exist for overweight or obese patients. Instead, overweight and obese patients displayed a negative correlation between OPP and IOP.",
keywords = "Blood pressure, Body mass index, Glaucoma, Intraocular pressure, Ocular perfusion pressure, Open-angle glaucoma",
author = "Sandra Ngo and Alon Harris and Brent Siesky and Anne Schroeder and George Eckert and Stephen Holland",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.5301/ejo.5000257",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "664--669",
journal = "European Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "1120-6721",
publisher = "Wichtig Publishing",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and body mass index in glaucoma patients

AU - Ngo, Sandra

AU - Harris, Alon

AU - Siesky, Brent

AU - Schroeder, Anne

AU - Eckert, George

AU - Holland, Stephen

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Purpose: To investigate relationships between blood pressure (BP), ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), and intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) of different body mass index (BMI) classes. Methods: Data from participants of a prospective, longitudinal, single site, observational study were analyzed. Patients with a prior diagnosis of OAG completed 2 baseline visits (1 week apart) with follow-up visits every 6 months for 2 years. At each visit, BP, weight, height, and IOP were recorded for normal-weight (BMI 18.5-24.9; n = 38), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9; n = 43), and obese (BMI ≥30; n = 34) patients: The BP was measured using automated ambulatory measurements after 5 minutes rest and IOP was measured using Goldmann applanation tonometry. Results: The IOP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in normal-weight (-1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.7 to -0.4), overweight (-1.9, 95% CI -3.4 to -0.4), and obese (-2.5, 95% CI -3.9 to -1.2) patients with OAG. Systolic BP (SBP) and OPP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in all 3 BMI categories, although not reaching statistical significance. In normal-weight patients, there was a significant, positive correlation between changes in IOP and SBP (r = 0.36, p = 0.0431). A significant, negative correlation was observed between changes in IOP and OPP in overweight (r = -0.56, p = 0.0002) and obese (r = -0.38, p = 0.0499) patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that in normal-weight individuals with OAG, changes in SBP were positively correlated to changes in IOP. However, this relationship did not exist for overweight or obese patients. Instead, overweight and obese patients displayed a negative correlation between OPP and IOP.

AB - Purpose: To investigate relationships between blood pressure (BP), ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), and intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) of different body mass index (BMI) classes. Methods: Data from participants of a prospective, longitudinal, single site, observational study were analyzed. Patients with a prior diagnosis of OAG completed 2 baseline visits (1 week apart) with follow-up visits every 6 months for 2 years. At each visit, BP, weight, height, and IOP were recorded for normal-weight (BMI 18.5-24.9; n = 38), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9; n = 43), and obese (BMI ≥30; n = 34) patients: The BP was measured using automated ambulatory measurements after 5 minutes rest and IOP was measured using Goldmann applanation tonometry. Results: The IOP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in normal-weight (-1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.7 to -0.4), overweight (-1.9, 95% CI -3.4 to -0.4), and obese (-2.5, 95% CI -3.9 to -1.2) patients with OAG. Systolic BP (SBP) and OPP decreased from baseline to 2-year measurement in all 3 BMI categories, although not reaching statistical significance. In normal-weight patients, there was a significant, positive correlation between changes in IOP and SBP (r = 0.36, p = 0.0431). A significant, negative correlation was observed between changes in IOP and OPP in overweight (r = -0.56, p = 0.0002) and obese (r = -0.38, p = 0.0499) patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that in normal-weight individuals with OAG, changes in SBP were positively correlated to changes in IOP. However, this relationship did not exist for overweight or obese patients. Instead, overweight and obese patients displayed a negative correlation between OPP and IOP.

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Body mass index

KW - Glaucoma

KW - Intraocular pressure

KW - Ocular perfusion pressure

KW - Open-angle glaucoma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881531329&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881531329&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5301/ejo.5000257

DO - 10.5301/ejo.5000257

M3 - Article

C2 - 23483493

AN - SCOPUS:84881531329

VL - 23

SP - 664

EP - 669

JO - European Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - European Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 1120-6721

IS - 5

ER -