Bone genes in the kidney of stone formers

Andrew P. Evan, Sharon B. Bledsoe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intraoperative papillary biopsies from kidneys of idiopathic-calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) have revealed a distinct pattern of mineral deposition in the interstitium of the renal papilla. The earliest sites of these deposits, termed Randall's plaque, are found in the basement membrane of thin loops of Henle and appear to spread into the surrounding interstitium down to the papillary epithelium. Recent studies show kidney stones of ICSF patients grow attached to the renal papilla and at sites of Randall's plaque. Together these observations suggest that plaque formation may be the critical step in stone formation. In order to control plaque formation and thereby reduce future kidney stone development, the mechanism of plaque deposition must be understood. Because the renal papilla has unique anatomical features similar to bone and the fact that the interstitial deposits of ICSF patients are formed of biological apatite, this paper tests the hypothesis that sites of interstitial plaque form as a result of cell-mediated osteoblast-like activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRenal Stone Disease 2 - 2nd International Urolithiasis Research Symposium
Pages33-43
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 2008
Event2nd International Urolithiasis Research Symposium - Indianapolis, IN, United States
Duration: Apr 17 2008Apr 18 2008

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1049
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other2nd International Urolithiasis Research Symposium
CountryUnited States
CityIndianapolis, IN
Period4/17/084/18/08

Keywords

  • Biopsy tissue
  • Human stone formers
  • Osteoblast-like activity
  • Plaque
  • Protein matrix

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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    Evan, A. P., & Bledsoe, S. B. (2008). Bone genes in the kidney of stone formers. In Renal Stone Disease 2 - 2nd International Urolithiasis Research Symposium (pp. 33-43). (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 1049). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2998053