Brain activation during working memory 1 month after mild traumatic brain injury

A functional MRI study

Thomas W. McAllister, Andrew Saykin, L. A. Flashman, M. B. Sparling, S. C. Johnson, S. J. Guerin, A. C. Mamourian, J. B. Weaver, N. Yanofsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

357 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess patterns of regional brain activation in response to varying working memory loads shortly after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Background: Many individuals complain of memory difficulty shortly after MTBI. Memory performance in these individuals can be normal despite these complaints. Methods: Brain activation patterns in response to a working memory task (auditory n-back) were assessed with functional MRI in 12 MTBI patients within 1 month of their injury and in 11 healthy control subjects. Results: Brain activation patterns differed between MTBI patients and control subjects in response to increasing working memory processing loads. Maximum intensity projections of statistical parametric maps in control subjects showed bifrontal and biparietal activation in response to a low processing load, with little additional increase in activation associated with the high load task. MTBI patients showed some activation during the low processing load task but significantly increased activation during the high load condition, particularly in the right parietal and right dorsolateral frontal regions. Task performance did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusion: MTBI patients differed from control subjects in activation pattern of working memory circuitry in response to different processing loads, despite similar task performance. This suggests that injury-related changes in ability to activate or to modulate working memory processing resources may underlie some of the memory complaints after MTBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1300-1308
Number of pages9
JournalNeurology
Volume53
Issue number6
StatePublished - Oct 12 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Brain Concussion
Short-Term Memory
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Task Performance and Analysis
Aptitude
Wounds and Injuries
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Functional MRI
  • Mild traumatic brain injury
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

McAllister, T. W., Saykin, A., Flashman, L. A., Sparling, M. B., Johnson, S. C., Guerin, S. J., ... Yanofsky, N. (1999). Brain activation during working memory 1 month after mild traumatic brain injury: A functional MRI study. Neurology, 53(6), 1300-1308.

Brain activation during working memory 1 month after mild traumatic brain injury : A functional MRI study. / McAllister, Thomas W.; Saykin, Andrew; Flashman, L. A.; Sparling, M. B.; Johnson, S. C.; Guerin, S. J.; Mamourian, A. C.; Weaver, J. B.; Yanofsky, N.

In: Neurology, Vol. 53, No. 6, 12.10.1999, p. 1300-1308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McAllister, TW, Saykin, A, Flashman, LA, Sparling, MB, Johnson, SC, Guerin, SJ, Mamourian, AC, Weaver, JB & Yanofsky, N 1999, 'Brain activation during working memory 1 month after mild traumatic brain injury: A functional MRI study', Neurology, vol. 53, no. 6, pp. 1300-1308.
McAllister TW, Saykin A, Flashman LA, Sparling MB, Johnson SC, Guerin SJ et al. Brain activation during working memory 1 month after mild traumatic brain injury: A functional MRI study. Neurology. 1999 Oct 12;53(6):1300-1308.
McAllister, Thomas W. ; Saykin, Andrew ; Flashman, L. A. ; Sparling, M. B. ; Johnson, S. C. ; Guerin, S. J. ; Mamourian, A. C. ; Weaver, J. B. ; Yanofsky, N. / Brain activation during working memory 1 month after mild traumatic brain injury : A functional MRI study. In: Neurology. 1999 ; Vol. 53, No. 6. pp. 1300-1308.
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