Breast cancer chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction.

Tim A. Ahles, Andrew Saykin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive side effects of systemic chemotherapy have become an increasing concern among breast cancer survivors, their families, and health care professionals. A growing body of research supports the hypothesis that chemotherapy can produce long-term cognitive changes in at least a subgroup of cancer survivors. We review evidence implicating systemic chemotherapy as the cause of cognitive changes; describe the limitations due to lack of longitudinal studies and gaps in knowledge (ie, no clear mechanism by which chemotherapy can produce cognitive changes has been proposed); discuss possible factors like age, intelligence quotient/education, and psychological, genetic, and hormonal factors that might increase risk for chemotherapy-induced cognitive changes; and outline future directions for research. Such future research includes large-scale, longitudinal studies of pretreatment neuropsychological assessments, use of imaging techniques and the development of animal models to study the mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced changes in cognitive functioning, and the development of interventions to prevent or reduce the negative cognitive effects of chemotherapy

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Breast Cancer
Volume3 Suppl 3
StatePublished - Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Longitudinal Studies
Family Health
Age Factors
Cognitive Dysfunction
Intelligence
Research
Animal Models
Psychology
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Breast cancer chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction. / Ahles, Tim A.; Saykin, Andrew.

In: Clinical Breast Cancer, Vol. 3 Suppl 3, 12.2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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