Brief clinical report: Correlation of functional magnetic source imaging with intraoperative cortical stimulation in neurosurgical patients

T. P L Roberts, H. A. Rowley, E. Zusman, M. Mcdermott, Nicholas Barbaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared noninvasive preoperative functional imaging by using magneto-encephalography (MEG) with intraoperative direct cortical stimulation in ten patients undergoing neurosurgery. The goal was to assess the accuracy and reliability of MEG-based functional imaging in these patients as a possible replacement or adjunct for direct cortical stimulation with electrocorticography. Objective comparison of intraoperative mapping with preoperative MEG procedures was achieved by intraoperative recording of mapped cortical locations for motor responses using an interactive image-guided surgical device, the ISG viewing wand, with which mapping points could be marked on a previously acquired (MRI) set. In all ten patients, at least one stimulation site elicited a response during both MEG and intraoperative mapping. The central sulcus ipsilateral to the lesion was only directly visible on high-resolution MRIs in 3/10 cases and equivocally in 2/10. Coregistered with MRI to form magnetic source images (MSIs), MEG predictions of the postcentral gyrus were possible in all 10 cases. In all 10 cases, these were in agreement with intraoperative estimation of the precentral gyrus. Functional mapping of somatosensory cortex was achieved noninvasively in surgical patients by using MSI. The accuracy, compared with cortical stimulation, was always sufficient to define motor and somatosensory strips.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-347
Number of pages9
JournalComputer Aided Surgery
Volume1
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Magnetoencephalography
Imaging techniques
Somatosensory Cortex
Magnetic resonance imaging
Neurosurgery
Motor Cortex
Frontal Lobe
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Magnetic source imaging
  • Presurgical mapping
  • Somatosensory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Surgery

Cite this

Brief clinical report : Correlation of functional magnetic source imaging with intraoperative cortical stimulation in neurosurgical patients. / Roberts, T. P L; Rowley, H. A.; Zusman, E.; Mcdermott, M.; Barbaro, Nicholas.

In: Computer Aided Surgery, Vol. 1, No. 6, 1995, p. 339-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roberts, T. P L ; Rowley, H. A. ; Zusman, E. ; Mcdermott, M. ; Barbaro, Nicholas. / Brief clinical report : Correlation of functional magnetic source imaging with intraoperative cortical stimulation in neurosurgical patients. In: Computer Aided Surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 1, No. 6. pp. 339-347.
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