Brief endocardial surge of Ca2+ transient but monotonic suppression of action potential occurs during acute ischemia in canine ventricular tissue

Takeshi Ueyama, Douglas P. Zipes, John C. Lopshire, Jiashin Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Ischemia suppresses action potentials (APs) by elevating interstitial K+ and activating KATP channels and alters cytosolic Ca2+ transients (CaTs) via metabolic inhibition. Objective To test the hypothesis that AP and CaT respond to ischemia with different spatiotemporal courses and patterns. Methods Thirty-four transmural wedges were isolated from canine left ventricular free walls, perfused arterially, and stained with voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive dyes. Twenty-eight wedges underwent 15 minutes of arterial occlusion during pacing at a cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (n = 19) or 600 ms (n = 9). Six other wedges had a sequential reduction of perfusion flow from full to 50%, 25%, and 10% at 300 ms PCL. AP and CaT were recorded on the cut-exposed transmural surfaces with an optical mapping system. Results Although ischemia suppressed APs, it enhanced CaT to 150% ± 10% (more in the endocardium than in the epicardium) and induced CaT alternans during the first 2 minutes of arterial occlusion and then suppressed CaT (PCL = 300 ms). Enhancement of CaT (to 159% ± 23%) also occurred during low flow (25%) perfusion (PCL = 300 ms). Faster suppression of AP occurred with subepicardial preference as compared to that of CaT. After 15 minutes of arterial occlusion, AP and CaT remained in only small regions during 300 ms PCL but were preserved in most regions during 600 ms PCL. Conclusions Early ischemia induced a surge and alternans in CaT and caused its dissociation from AP both in time course of suppression and in spatial distribution. These results suggested that there were different cellular regulatory mechanisms of AP and of CaT in responding to ischemia from arterial occlusion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1201-1208
Number of pages8
JournalHeart Rhythm
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

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Action Potentials
Canidae
Ischemia
Perfusion
Endocardium
KATP Channels
Optical Devices
Pericardium
Coloring Agents

Keywords

  • Action potential
  • Acute ischemia
  • Ca transient
  • Optical mapping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Brief endocardial surge of Ca2+ transient but monotonic suppression of action potential occurs during acute ischemia in canine ventricular tissue. / Ueyama, Takeshi; Zipes, Douglas P.; Lopshire, John C.; Wu, Jiashin.

In: Heart Rhythm, Vol. 10, No. 8, 08.2013, p. 1201-1208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ueyama, Takeshi ; Zipes, Douglas P. ; Lopshire, John C. ; Wu, Jiashin. / Brief endocardial surge of Ca2+ transient but monotonic suppression of action potential occurs during acute ischemia in canine ventricular tissue. In: Heart Rhythm. 2013 ; Vol. 10, No. 8. pp. 1201-1208.
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abstract = "Background Ischemia suppresses action potentials (APs) by elevating interstitial K+ and activating KATP channels and alters cytosolic Ca2+ transients (CaTs) via metabolic inhibition. Objective To test the hypothesis that AP and CaT respond to ischemia with different spatiotemporal courses and patterns. Methods Thirty-four transmural wedges were isolated from canine left ventricular free walls, perfused arterially, and stained with voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive dyes. Twenty-eight wedges underwent 15 minutes of arterial occlusion during pacing at a cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (n = 19) or 600 ms (n = 9). Six other wedges had a sequential reduction of perfusion flow from full to 50{\%}, 25{\%}, and 10{\%} at 300 ms PCL. AP and CaT were recorded on the cut-exposed transmural surfaces with an optical mapping system. Results Although ischemia suppressed APs, it enhanced CaT to 150{\%} ± 10{\%} (more in the endocardium than in the epicardium) and induced CaT alternans during the first 2 minutes of arterial occlusion and then suppressed CaT (PCL = 300 ms). Enhancement of CaT (to 159{\%} ± 23{\%}) also occurred during low flow (25{\%}) perfusion (PCL = 300 ms). Faster suppression of AP occurred with subepicardial preference as compared to that of CaT. After 15 minutes of arterial occlusion, AP and CaT remained in only small regions during 300 ms PCL but were preserved in most regions during 600 ms PCL. Conclusions Early ischemia induced a surge and alternans in CaT and caused its dissociation from AP both in time course of suppression and in spatial distribution. These results suggested that there were different cellular regulatory mechanisms of AP and of CaT in responding to ischemia from arterial occlusion.",
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N2 - Background Ischemia suppresses action potentials (APs) by elevating interstitial K+ and activating KATP channels and alters cytosolic Ca2+ transients (CaTs) via metabolic inhibition. Objective To test the hypothesis that AP and CaT respond to ischemia with different spatiotemporal courses and patterns. Methods Thirty-four transmural wedges were isolated from canine left ventricular free walls, perfused arterially, and stained with voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive dyes. Twenty-eight wedges underwent 15 minutes of arterial occlusion during pacing at a cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (n = 19) or 600 ms (n = 9). Six other wedges had a sequential reduction of perfusion flow from full to 50%, 25%, and 10% at 300 ms PCL. AP and CaT were recorded on the cut-exposed transmural surfaces with an optical mapping system. Results Although ischemia suppressed APs, it enhanced CaT to 150% ± 10% (more in the endocardium than in the epicardium) and induced CaT alternans during the first 2 minutes of arterial occlusion and then suppressed CaT (PCL = 300 ms). Enhancement of CaT (to 159% ± 23%) also occurred during low flow (25%) perfusion (PCL = 300 ms). Faster suppression of AP occurred with subepicardial preference as compared to that of CaT. After 15 minutes of arterial occlusion, AP and CaT remained in only small regions during 300 ms PCL but were preserved in most regions during 600 ms PCL. Conclusions Early ischemia induced a surge and alternans in CaT and caused its dissociation from AP both in time course of suppression and in spatial distribution. These results suggested that there were different cellular regulatory mechanisms of AP and of CaT in responding to ischemia from arterial occlusion.

AB - Background Ischemia suppresses action potentials (APs) by elevating interstitial K+ and activating KATP channels and alters cytosolic Ca2+ transients (CaTs) via metabolic inhibition. Objective To test the hypothesis that AP and CaT respond to ischemia with different spatiotemporal courses and patterns. Methods Thirty-four transmural wedges were isolated from canine left ventricular free walls, perfused arterially, and stained with voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive dyes. Twenty-eight wedges underwent 15 minutes of arterial occlusion during pacing at a cycle length (PCL) of 300 ms (n = 19) or 600 ms (n = 9). Six other wedges had a sequential reduction of perfusion flow from full to 50%, 25%, and 10% at 300 ms PCL. AP and CaT were recorded on the cut-exposed transmural surfaces with an optical mapping system. Results Although ischemia suppressed APs, it enhanced CaT to 150% ± 10% (more in the endocardium than in the epicardium) and induced CaT alternans during the first 2 minutes of arterial occlusion and then suppressed CaT (PCL = 300 ms). Enhancement of CaT (to 159% ± 23%) also occurred during low flow (25%) perfusion (PCL = 300 ms). Faster suppression of AP occurred with subepicardial preference as compared to that of CaT. After 15 minutes of arterial occlusion, AP and CaT remained in only small regions during 300 ms PCL but were preserved in most regions during 600 ms PCL. Conclusions Early ischemia induced a surge and alternans in CaT and caused its dissociation from AP both in time course of suppression and in spatial distribution. These results suggested that there were different cellular regulatory mechanisms of AP and of CaT in responding to ischemia from arterial occlusion.

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