Broadening the concept of adolescent promiscuity

male accountability made visible and the implications for family therapists

Mary Dankoski, Rosemary Payer, Marilyn Steinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper is meant to broaden the concept of adolescent promiscuity to include male promiscuity and the gender bias that holds females accountable for sexual activity and ignores the role the male has in sexual activity and its consequences. The multiple systems which influence male teenage sexual behavior are examined. Communication patterns, family structure, availability and involvement of parent(s), the influence of gender stereotypes, cultural and ethnic influences, and the effects of the educational system are all examined in light of this broadened concept of male promiscuity. Family therapists possess the kind of knowledge and skills that can alter communication patterns, redefine boundaries, and promote the healthy parental involvement it takes to make an impact on the issue of male sexual promiscuity. Recommendations are made to family therapists with regard to assessment procedures and self-of the-therapist examination. Suggestions for interventions and directives in treatment are given to family therapists who wish to make this issue a part of their concern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-381
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Family Therapy
Volume24
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Responsibility
therapist
adolescent
communication pattern
responsibility
Sexual Behavior
Communication
gender
Sexism
family structure
educational system
stereotype
parents
examination
trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Broadening the concept of adolescent promiscuity : male accountability made visible and the implications for family therapists. / Dankoski, Mary; Payer, Rosemary; Steinberg, Marilyn.

In: American Journal of Family Therapy, Vol. 24, No. 4, 1996, p. 367-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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